Earth pyramid
Pyramid Pyr"a*mid, n. [L. pyramis, -idis, fr. Gr. ?, ?, of Egyptian origin: cf. F. pyramide.] [1913 Webster] 1. A solid body standing on a triangular, square, or polygonal base, and terminating in a point at the top; especially, a structure or edifice of this shape. [1913 Webster]

2. (Geom.) A solid figure contained by a plane rectilineal figure as base and several triangles which have a common vertex and whose bases are sides of the base. [1913 Webster]

3. pl. (Billiards) The game of pool in which the balls are placed in the form of a triangle at spot. [Eng.] [1913 Webster]

4. (Finance) a fraudulent investment scheme in which the manager promises high profits, but instead of investing the money in a genuine profit-making activity, uses the money from later investors to pay the profits to earlier investors; -- also called {pyramid scheme} or {pyramid operation}. This process inevitably collapses when insufficient new investors are available, leaving the later investors with total or near-total losses of their investments. The managers usually blame government regulations or interference for the collapse of the scheme, rather than admit fraud. [PJC]

{Altitude of a pyramid} (Geom.), the perpendicular distance from the vertex to the plane of the base.

{Axis of a pyramid} (Geom.), a straight line drawn from the vertex to the center of the base.

{Earth pyramid}. (Geol.) See {Earth pillars}, under {Earth}.

{Right pyramid} (Geom.) a pyramid whose axis is perpendicular to the base. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • earth pyramid — noun see earth pillar …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pyramid — Pyr a*mid, n. [L. pyramis, idis, fr. Gr. ?, ?, of Egyptian origin: cf. F. pyramide.] [1913 Webster] 1. A solid body standing on a triangular, square, or polygonal base, and terminating in a point at the top; especially, a structure or edifice of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pyramid operation — Pyramid Pyr a*mid, n. [L. pyramis, idis, fr. Gr. ?, ?, of Egyptian origin: cf. F. pyramide.] [1913 Webster] 1. A solid body standing on a triangular, square, or polygonal base, and terminating in a point at the top; especially, a structure or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pyramid scheme — Pyramid Pyr a*mid, n. [L. pyramis, idis, fr. Gr. ?, ?, of Egyptian origin: cf. F. pyramide.] [1913 Webster] 1. A solid body standing on a triangular, square, or polygonal base, and terminating in a point at the top; especially, a structure or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • earth pillar — noun also earth pyramid : a column of unconsolidated earth materials that is formed by differential erosion and that typically tapers upward and is often capped by a stone called also demoiselle * * * Geol. a pillar of earthy matter left by… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pyramid (card game) — Pyramid is a dedicated deck card game, based on a similar game played in the original Battlestar Galactica series. In the reimagined Battlestar Galactica series it is referred to as Triad while the term Pyramid is now used to refer to the close… …   Wikipedia

  • Pyramid of the Magician — Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal, Mexico. March 2007 The Pyramid of the Magician is a Mesoamerican step pyramid located in the ancient, Pre Columbian city of Uxmal, Mexico. The structure is also referred to as the Pyramid of the Dwarf, Casa el… …   Wikipedia

  • Pyramid — This article is about pyramid shaped structures. For the geometric term, see Pyramid (geometry). For other uses, see Pyramid (disambiguation). The Egyptian pyramids of the Giza Necropolis, as seen from above …   Wikipedia

  • pyramid — pyramidlike, adj. /pir euh mid/, n. 1. Archit. a. (in ancient Egypt) a quadrilateral masonry mass having smooth, steeply sloping sides meeting at an apex, used as a tomb. b. (in ancient Egypt and pre Columbian Central America) a quadrilateral… …   Universalium

  • Pyramid inch — The pyramid inch, infrequently called the sacred Jewish inchFact|date=July 2007, is a unit of measure claimed by pyramidologists to have been used in ancient times. Supposedly it was one twenty fifth of a sacred cubit , 1.00106 British inches, or …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”