ablative absolute
Ablative Ab"la*tive, (Gram.) The ablative case. [1913 Webster]

{ablative absolute}, a construction in Latin, in which a noun in the ablative case has a participle (either expressed or implied), agreeing with it in gender, number, and case, both words forming a clause by themselves and being unconnected, grammatically, with the rest of the sentence; as, Tarquinio regnante, Pythagoras venit, i. e., Tarquinius reigning, Pythagoras came. [1913 Webster] ||


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ablative absolute — n. Gram. in Latin, a grammatically independent phrase containing a noun in the ablative case and a participle, pronoun, or second noun also in the ablative case, used to express time, cause, or circumstance …   English World dictionary

  • ablative absolute — noun Date: circa 1828 a construction in Latin in which a noun or pronoun and its adjunct both in the ablative case form together an adverbial phrase expressing generally the time, cause, or an attendant circumstance of an action …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • ablative absolute — Latin Gram. a construction not dependent upon any other part of the sentence, consisting of a noun and a participle, noun and adjective, or two nouns, in which both members are in the ablative case, as Latin via facta, the road having been made.… …   Universalium

  • ablative absolute — noun A construction in Latin in which an independent phrase with a noun in the ablative case has a participle, expressed or implied, which agrees with it in gender, number and case ndash; both words forming a clause grammatically unconnected with …   Wiktionary

  • ablative absolute — noun a construction in Latin which consists of a noun and participle or adjective in the ablative case and which functions as a sentence adverb, for example mirabile dictu ‘wonderful to relate’ …   English new terms dictionary

  • ablative absolute — ab′lative ab′solute n. gram. (in Latin) a grammatical construction independent of the rest of the sentence, consisting of a noun and a participle, noun and adjective, or two nouns, both in the ablative case, as Latin viā factā“the road having… …   From formal English to slang

  • ablative absolute — /æblətɪv ˈæbsəlut/ (say abluhtiv absuhlooht) noun (in Latin grammar) a construction not dependent upon any other part of the sentence, consisting of a noun and a participle, noun and adjective, or two nouns, in which both members are in the… …   Australian English dictionary

  • ablative absolute —   , Latin adverbial phrase formed by noun and adjunct (especially participle), both in ablative …   Dictionary of difficult words

  • ablative absolute — noun a constituent in Latin grammar; a noun and its modifier can function as a sentence modifier • Hypernyms: ↑constituent, ↑grammatical constituent …   Useful english dictionary

  • Absolute — Ab so*lute, a. [L. absolutus, p. p. of absolvere: cf. F. absolu. See {Absolve}.] 1. Loosed from any limitation or condition; uncontrolled; unrestricted; unconditional; as, absolute authority, monarchy, sovereignty, an absolute promise or command; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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