Dutch
German Ger"man, n.; pl. {Germans}[L. Germanus, prob. of Celtis origin.] 1. A native or one of the people of Germany. [1913 Webster]

2. The German language. [1913 Webster]

3. (a) A round dance, often with a waltz movement, abounding in capriciosly involved figures. (b) A social party at which the german is danced. [1913 Webster]

{High German}, the Teutonic dialect of Upper or Southern Germany, -- comprising Old High German, used from the 8th to the 11th century; Middle H. G., from the 12th to the 15th century; and Modern or New H. G., the language of Luther's Bible version and of modern German literature. The dialects of Central Germany, the basis of the modern literary language, are often called Middle German, and the Southern German dialects Upper German; but High German is also used to cover both groups.

{Low German}, the language of Northern Germany and the Netherlands, -- including {Friesic}; {Anglo-Saxon} or {Saxon}; {Old Saxon}; {Dutch} or {Low Dutch}, with its dialect, {Flemish}; and {Plattdeutsch} (called also {Low German}), spoken in many dialects. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dutch — usually refers to: Something from or related to the Netherlands Dutch people, people from the Netherlands or their descendants Dutch language, spoken in the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Maarten, and Sint… …   Wikipedia

  • Dutch — Dutch, a. [D. duitsch German; or G. deutsch, orig., popular, national, OD. dietsc, MHG. diutsch, tiutsch, OHG. diutisk, fr. diot, diota, a people, a nation; akin to AS. pe[ o]d, OS. thiod, thioda, Goth. piuda; cf. Lith. tauta land, OIr. tuath… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dutch — (engl., über ndd.: dütsch, hd.: deutsch) bezeichnet folgende Sprachen: Berbice Dutch Creole, ausgestorbene Kreolsprache Jersey Dutch, Sprache niederländischer Einwanderer in New Jersey Niederländische Sprache (engl.: dutch language),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dutch — late 14c., used first of Germans generally, after c.1600 of Hollanders, from M.Du. duutsch, from O.H.G. duit isc, corresponding to O.E. þeodisc belonging to the people, used especially of the common language of Germanic people, from þeod people,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Dutch — [duch] adj. [ME Duch < MDu Duutsch, Dutch, German, akin to Ger Deutsch: see DEUTSCHLAND] 1. of the Netherlands or its people, language, or culture ☆ 2. of the Pennsylvania Dutch or their language or culture n. the West Germanic language spoken …   English World dictionary

  • dutch — belted (black dairy cattle with a broad body encircling white belt of hair as originally bred in the Netherlands); dutch door (horizontally divided so either the top or bottom section may be closed or opened); dutch courage (inspired by alcohol); …   Eponyms, nicknames, and geographical games

  • dutch — dutch; dutch·i·fy; dutch·ly; dutch·man; Dutch; …   English syllables

  • Dutch — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ relating to the Netherlands or its language. ► NOUN ▪ the Germanic language of the Netherlands. ● go Dutch Cf. ↑go Dutch ORIGIN Dutch dutsch Dutch, Netherlandish, German …   English terms dictionary

  • Dutch — Dutch, n. 1. pl. The people of Holland; Dutchmen. [1913 Webster] 2. The language spoken in Holland. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dutch — ► NOUN (usu. one s old dutch) Brit. informal ▪ (among cockneys) one s wife. ORIGIN abbreviation of DUCHESS(Cf. ↑duchess) …   English terms dictionary

  • Dutch — 1. adjective /dʌtʃ/ a) Pertaining to the Dutch, the Germans, and the Goths; Germanic, Teutonic. b) Of or pertaining to the Netherlands, the Dutch people or the Dutch language. 2. noun /dʌtʃ/ …   Wiktionary

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