Drive Drive (dr[imac]v), v. t. [imp. {Drove} (dr[=o]v), formerly {Drave} (dr[=a]v); p. p. {Driven} (dr[i^]v'n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Driving}.] [AS. dr[=i]fan; akin to OS. dr[=i]ban, D. drijven, OHG. tr[=i]ban, G. treiben, Icel. dr[=i]fa, Goth. dreiban. Cf. {Drift}, {Drove}.] 1. To impel or urge onward by force in a direction away from one, or along before one; to push forward; to compel to move on; to communicate motion to; as, to drive cattle; to drive a nail; smoke drives persons from a room. [1913 Webster]

A storm came on and drove them into Pylos. --Jowett (Thucyd. ). [1913 Webster]

Shield pressed on shield, and man drove man along. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Go drive the deer and drag the finny prey. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To urge on and direct the motions of, as the beasts which draw a vehicle, or the vehicle borne by them; hence, also, to take in a carriage; to convey in a vehicle drawn by beasts; as, to drive a pair of horses or a stage; to drive a person to his own door. [1913 Webster]

How . . . proud he was to drive such a brother! --Thackeray. [1913 Webster]

3. To urge, impel, or hurry forward; to force; to constrain; to urge, press, or bring to a point or state; as, to drive a person by necessity, by persuasion, by force of circumstances, by argument, and the like. `` Enough to drive one mad.'' --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

He, driven to dismount, threatened, if I did not do the like, to do as much for my horse as fortune had done for his. --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

4. To carry or; to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute. [Now used only colloquially.] --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

The trade of life can not be driven without partners. --Collier. [1913 Webster]

5. To clear, by forcing away what is contained. [1913 Webster]

To drive the country, force the swains away. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. (Mining) To dig Horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel. --Tomlinson. [1913 Webster]

7. To pass away; -- said of time. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

8. Specif., in various games, as tennis, baseball, etc., to propel (the ball) swiftly by a direct stroke or forcible throw. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. to operate (a vehicle) while it is on motion, by manipulating the controls, such as the steering, propulsion, and braking mechanisms. [PJC]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • drive — [drīv] vt. drove, driven, driving [ME driven < OE drifan, akin to Goth dreiban, Ger treiben, ON drīfa < IE base * dhreibh , to push] 1. to force to go; urge onward; push forward 2. to force into or from a state or act [driven mad] 3. to… …   English World dictionary

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