Drag Drag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dragged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dragging}.] [OE. draggen; akin to Sw. dragga to search with a grapnel, fr. dragg grapnel, fr. draga to draw, the same word as E. draw. ? See {Draw}.] 1. To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; -- applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing. [1913 Webster]

Dragged by the cords which through his feet were thrust. --Denham. [1913 Webster]

The grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

A needless Alexandrine ends the song That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag. [1913 Webster]

Then while I dragged my brains for such a song. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

3. To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty. [1913 Webster]

Have dragged a lingering life. -- Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{To drag an anchor} (Naut.), to trail it along the bottom when the anchor will not hold the ship.

Syn: See {Draw}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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