Doctors' Commons
Commons Com"mons, n. pl., 1. The mass of the people, as distinguished from the titled classes or nobility; the commonalty; the common people. [Eng.] [1913 Webster]

'T is like the commons, rude unpolished hinds, Could send such message to their sovereign. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The word commons in its present ordinary signification comprises all the people who are under the rank of peers. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

2. The House of Commons, or lower house of the British Parliament, consisting of representatives elected by the qualified voters of counties, boroughs, and universities. [1913 Webster]

It is agreed that the Commons were no part of the great council till some ages after the Conquest. --Hume. [1913 Webster]

3. Provisions; food; fare, -- as that provided at a common table in colleges and universities. [1913 Webster]

Their commons, though but coarse, were nothing scant. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. A club or association for boarding at a common table, as in a college, the members sharing the expenses equally; as, to board in commons. [1913 Webster]

5. A common; public pasture ground. [1913 Webster]

To shake his ears, and graze in commons. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Doctors' Commons}, a place near St. Paul's Churchyard in London where the doctors of civil law used to common together, and where were the ecclesiastical and admiralty courts and offices having jurisdiction of marriage licenses, divorces, registration of wills, etc.

{To be on short commons}, to have a small allowance of food. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Doctors' Commons — in the early 19th century. This Plaque …   Wikipedia

  • Doctors' Commons — plural noun Before the establishment of the Divorce Court and Probate Court in 1857, the college of the doctors of civil law in London, incorporated by royal charter in 1768 • • • Main Entry: ↑doctor …   Useful english dictionary

  • Doctors' Commons —    Between Knightrider Street north and Queen Victoria Street south. In Castle Baynard Ward (O.S. 1880).    First mention: 1535 (L. and P. H. VIII. IX. p. 182).    Other names : Garden of the capital house lately called Mountjoye place, and now… …   Dictionary of London

  • Doctors' Commons — doctor doc tor, n. [OF. doctur, L. doctor, teacher, fr. docere to teach. See {Docile}.] 1. A teacher; one skilled in a profession, or branch of knowledge; a learned man. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] One of the doctors of Italy, Nicholas Macciavel. Bacon …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Doctors’ Commons — Die Doctors Commons im frühen 19. Jahrhundert Die Doctors’ Commons waren eine Vereinigung von Rechtsanwälten in England, die von 1511 bis 1865. Im Gegensatz zu den Rechtsanwälten der Inns of Court wandten sie jedoch nicht das Common law, sondern… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Doctors' Commons — ▪ legal society       formerly a self governing teaching body of practitioners of canon and civil law. Located in London, it was similar to the Inns of Court, where English common law, rather than civil law, was taught. Members of the Doctors… …   Universalium

  • DOCTORS' COMMONS —    a college of doctors of the civil law in London, where they used to eat in common, and where eventually a number of the courts of law were held …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • Doctors' Commons — An institution near St. Paul s Cathedral, where the ecclesiastical and admiralty courts are held. In 1768, a royal charter was obtained, by virtue of which the members of the society and their successors were incorporated under the name and title …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Commons — Com mons, n. pl., 1. The mass of the people, as distinguished from the titled classes or nobility; the commonalty; the common people. [Eng.] [1913 Webster] T is like the commons, rude unpolished hinds, Could send such message to their sovereign.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be on short commons — Commons Com mons, n. pl., 1. The mass of the people, as distinguished from the titled classes or nobility; the commonalty; the common people. [Eng.] [1913 Webster] T is like the commons, rude unpolished hinds, Could send such message to their… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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