Distraining
Distrain Dis*train", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distraining}.] [OE. destreinen to force, OF. destreindre to press, oppress, force, fr. L. distringere, districtum, to draw asunder, hinder, molest, LL., to punish severely; di- = stringere to draw tight, press together. See {Strain}, and cf. {Distress}, {District}, {Distraint}.] 1. To press heavily upon; to bear down upon with violence; hence, to constrain or compel; to bind; to distress, torment, or afflict. [Obs.] ``Distrained with chains.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

2. To rend; to tear. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Neither guile nor force might it [a net] distrain. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) (a) To seize, as a pledge or indemnification; to take possession of as security for nonpayment of rent, the reparation of an injury done, etc.; to take by distress; as, to distrain goods for rent, or of an amercement. (b) To subject to distress; to coerce; as, to distrain a person by his goods and chattels. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • distraining — index confiscatory Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • distraining — dis·train || dɪ streɪn v. foreclose on property, take property in payment for debts …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Abuse of distress — Distress Dis*tress , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d[ e]tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See {Distrain}, and cf. {Stress}.] 1. Extreme pain or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Distress — Dis*tress , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d[ e]tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See {Distrain}, and cf. {Stress}.] 1. Extreme pain or suffering;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Apothecaries Act 1815 — The Apothecaries Act 1815 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (citation 55 Geo.lll, c.194) with the long title An Act for better regulating the Practice of Apothecaries throughout England and Wales . The Act introduced compulsory… …   Wikipedia

  • distress — distressingly, adv. /di stres /, n. 1. great pain, anxiety, or sorrow; acute physical or mental suffering; affliction; trouble. 2. a state of extreme necessity or misfortune. 3. the state of a ship or airplane requiring immediate assistance, as… …   Universalium

  • Distrain — Dis*train , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distraining}.] [OE. destreinen to force, OF. destreindre to press, oppress, force, fr. L. distringere, districtum, to draw asunder, hinder, molest, LL., to punish severely; di =… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Distrained — Distrain Dis*train , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distraining}.] [OE. destreinen to force, OF. destreindre to press, oppress, force, fr. L. distringere, districtum, to draw asunder, hinder, molest, LL., to punish severely;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Distrainor — Dis*train or, n. (Law) One who distrains; the party distraining goods or chattels. Blackstone. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Namation — Na*ma tion, n. [LL. namare to take; cf. AS. niman to take.] (O. Eng. & Scots Law) A distraining or levying of a distress; an impounding. Burrill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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