dishonour
Dishonor Dis*hon"or (d[i^]s*[o^]n"[~e]r or d[i^]z*[o^]n"[~e]r), n. [OE. deshonour, dishonour, OF. deshonor, deshonur, F. d['e]shonneur; pref. des- (L. dis-) + honor, honur, F. honneur, fr. L. honor. See {Honor}.] [Written also {dishonour}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Lack of honor; disgrace; ignominy; shame; reproach. [1913 Webster]

It was not meet for us to see the king's dishonor. --Ezra iv. 14. [1913 Webster]

His honor rooted in dishonor stood. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) The nonpayment or nonacceptance of commercial paper by the party on whom it is drawn.

Syn: Disgrace; ignominy; shame; censure; reproach; opprobrium. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dishonour — dis‧hon‧our [dɪsˈɒnə ǁ ˈɑːnər] , dishonor verb [transitive] 1. BANKING if a bank dishonours a cheque, it refuses to pay out money for it, usually because the person who has written it does not have enough money in their account: • The law is that …   Financial and business terms

  • dishonour — (US dishonor) ► NOUN ▪ a state of shame or disgrace. ► VERB 1) bring dishonour to. 2) fail to honour (an agreement, cheque, etc.) …   English terms dictionary

  • dishonour — British spelling of DISHONOR (Cf. dishonor); also see OR (Cf. or). Related: Dishonoured; dishonouring; dishonourable; dishonourably …   Etymology dictionary

  • dishonour — I UK [dɪsˈɒnə(r)] / US [dɪsˈɑnər] noun [uncountable] a state in which people no longer respect you because of something bad that you have done Their motto was Death before Dishonour . bring dishonour on/upon: What she had done had brought… …   English dictionary

  • dishonour — n. 1) to bring dishonour on, to 2) a dishonour to * * * [dɪs ɒnə] to a dishonour to to bring dishonour on …   Combinatory dictionary

  • dishonour — [[t]dɪsɒ̱nə(r)[/t]] dishonours, dishonouring, dishonoured (in AM, use dishonor) 1) VERB If you dishonour someone, you behave in a way that damages their good reputation. [FORMAL] [V n] It would dishonour my family if I didn t wear the veil. 2) N… …   English dictionary

  • dishonour — dis|hon|our1 BrE dishonor AmE [dısˈɔnə US ˈa:nər] n [U] loss of respect from other people, because you have behaved in a morally unacceptable way ≠ ↑honour ▪ You ve brought enough dishonour on your family already without causing any more trouble …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • dishonour — 1 BrE, dishonor AmE noun (U) formal loss of respect from other people because you have behaved in a morally unacceptable way: bring dishonour on: You ve brought enough dishonour on your family already without causing any more trouble. 2 BrE,,… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • dishonour — 1) To fail to pay a cheque when the account of the drawer does not have sufficient funds to cover it. When a bank dishonours a cheque it marks it ‘refer to drawer’ and returns it to the payee through his or her bank. 2) To fail to accept a bill… …   Accounting dictionary

  • dishonour — 1) To fail to pay a cheque when the account of the drawer does not have sufficient funds to cover it. When a bank dishonours a cheque it marks it refer to drawer and returns it to the payee through his or her bank. 2) To fail to accept a bill of… …   Big dictionary of business and management

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