Disgust
Disgust Dis*gust", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disgusted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disgusting}.] [OF. desgouster, F. d['e]go[^u]ter; pref. des- (L. dis-) + gouster to taste, F. go[^u]ter, fr. L. gustare, fr. gustus taste. See {Gust} to taste.] To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; -- often with at, with, or by. [1913 Webster]

To disgust him with the world and its vanities. --Prescott. [1913 Webster]

[AE]rius is expressly declared . . . to have been disgusted at failing. --J. H. Newman. [1913 Webster]

Alarmed and disgusted by the proceedings of the convention. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • disgust — vb Disgust, sicken, nauseate are comparable when meaning to arouse an extreme distaste in. Disgust implies a stomach that is revolted by food offered or taken; in its extended use it implies sensibilities which are revolted by something seen,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Disgust — Dis*gust , n. [Cf. OF. desgoust, F. d[ e]go[^u]t. See {Disgust}, v. t.] Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disgust — [dis gust′] n. [MFr desgoust, distaste < des (see DIS ) + L gustus, a taste, relish: see GUSTO] a sickening distaste or dislike; deep aversion; repugnance vt. [MFr desgouster < des (see DIS ) + L gustare, to taste] to cause to feel disgust; …   English World dictionary

  • disgust — (n.) 1590s, from M.Fr. desgoust strong dislike, repugnance, lit. distaste (16c., Mod.Fr. dégoût), from desgouster have a distaste for, from des opposite of (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + gouster taste, from L. gustare to taste (see …   Etymology dictionary

  • disgust — [n] aversion; repulsion abhorrence, abomination, antipathy, detestation, dislike, distaste, hatefulness, hatred, loathing, nausea, nauseation, nauseousness, objection, repugnance, revolt, revulsion, satiation, satiety, sickness, surfeit; concepts …   New thesaurus

  • disgust — ► NOUN ▪ strong revulsion or profound indignation. ► VERB ▪ cause disgust in. DERIVATIVES disgusted adjective disgustedly adverb. ORIGIN French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin gustus taste …   English terms dictionary

  • disgust — index contempt (disdain), dissatisfaction, distress, odium, pique Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Disgust — Yuck and Eew , two words often uttered to display disgust, redirect here. For the band Yuck , see, Yuck (band). For the activity yuck , see laughter. Disgust is a type of aversion that involves withdrawing from a person or object with strong… …   Wikipedia

  • disgust — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ great ▪ absolute, complete, pure, total, utter ▪ mild, slight ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • disgust — dis|gust1 [dısˈgʌst, dız ] n [U] 1.) a strong feeling of dislike, annoyance, or disapproval with disgust ▪ Joan looked at him with disgust. in disgust ▪ Sam threw his books down in disgust and stormed out of the room. to sb s disgust ▪ Much to my …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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