Disease germ
Disease Dis*ease", n. [OE. disese, OF. desaise; des- (L. dis-) + aise ease. See {Ease}.] 1. Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

So all that night they passed in great disease. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

To shield thee from diseases of the world. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. An alteration in the state of the body or of some of its organs, interrupting or disturbing the performance of the vital functions, and causing or threatening pain and weakness; malady; affection; illness; sickness; disorder; -- applied figuratively to the mind, to the moral character and habits, to institutions, the state, etc. [1913 Webster]

Diseases desperate grown, By desperate appliances are relieved. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The instability, injustice, and confusion introduced into the public counsels have, in truth, been the mortal diseases under which popular governments have every where perished. --Madison. [1913 Webster]

{Disease germ}. See under {Germ}.

Syn: Distemper; ailing; ailment; malady; disorder; sickness; illness; complaint; indisposition; affection. -- {Disease}, {Disorder}, {Distemper}, {Malady}, {Affection}. Disease is the leading medical term. Disorder mean? much the same, with perhaps some slight reference to an irregularity of the system. Distemper is now used by physicians only of the diseases of animals. Malady is not a medical term, and is less used than formerly in literature. Affection has special reference to the part, organ, or function disturbed; as, his disease is an affection of the lungs. A disease is usually deep-seated and permanent, or at least prolonged; a disorder is often slight, partial, and temporary; malady has less of a technical sense than the other terms, and refers more especially to the suffering endured. In a figurative sense we speak of a disease mind, of disordered faculties, and of mental maladies. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disease germ — Germ Germ (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disease germ — noun : a minute organism (as a bacterium or virus) that causes disease …   Useful english dictionary

  • Germ — (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under which an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Germ cell — Germ Germ (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Germ gland — Germ Germ (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Germ stock — Germ Germ (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Germ theory — Germ Germ (j[ e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Disease — Dis*ease , n. [OE. disese, OF. desaise; des (L. dis ) + aise ease. See {Ease}.] 1. Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] So all that night they passed in great disease. Spenser. [1913 Webster] To shield thee …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Germ — can mean: * Microorganism, especially a pathogenic one; see Germ theory of disease. * Germ cell, a cell that has all the information to grow into a complete adult organism. * The Germ (periodical), a periodical established by the Pre Raphaelite… …   Wikipedia

  • germ — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. microorganism; seed, embryo; microbe, bacterium; beginning, rudiment; source, origin, cause. See littleness. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Origin] Syn. inception, source, root, basis; see origin 3 . 2.… …   English dictionary for students

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