Disdain
Disdain Dis*dain" (?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disdained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disdaining}.] [OE. disdainen, desdainen, OF. desdeigner, desdaigner, F. d['e]daigner; des- (L. dis-) + daigner to deign, fr. L. dignari to deem worthy. See {Deign}.] 1. To think unworthy; to deem unsuitable or unbecoming; as, to disdain to do a mean act. [1913 Webster]

Disdaining . . . that any should bear the armor of the best knight living. --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

2. To reject as unworthy of one's self, or as not deserving one's notice; to look with scorn upon; to scorn, as base acts, character, etc. [1913 Webster]

When the Philistine . . . saw David, he disdained him; for he was but a youth. --1 Sam. xvii. 42. [1913 Webster]

'T is great, 't is manly to disdain disguise. --Young.

Syn: To contemn; despise; scorn. See {Contemn}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disdain — Dis*dain (?; 277), n. [OE. desdain, disdein, OF. desdein, desdaing, F. d[ e]dain, fr. the verb. See {Disdain}, v. t.] 1. A feeling of contempt and aversion; the regarding anything as unworthy of or beneath one; scorn. [1913 Webster] How my soul… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Disdain — (or disdainment or disdainfully) is a feeling of contempt or scorn. Disdain may also refer to:* So Disdained 1928 novel by Nevil Shute …   Wikipedia

  • disdain — (v.) late 14c., from O.Fr. desdeignier disdain, scorn, refuse, repudiate, from des do the opposite of (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + deignier treat as worthy (see DEIGN (Cf. deign)). The noun is mid 14c., desdegne, earlier dedeyne (c.1300). Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • disdain — n scorn, despite, contempt (see under DESPISE) Analogous words: aversion, *antipathy: insolence, superciliousness, arrogance (see corresponding adjectives at PROUD) Contrasted words: *regard, admiration, respect, esteem: *reverence, awe, fear …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • disdain — [n] hate; indifference antipathy, arrogance, aversion, contempt, contumely, deri sion, despisal, despisement, despite, dislike, disparagement, hatred, haughtiness, hauteur, insolence, loftiness, pride, ridicule, scorn, sneering, snobbishness,… …   New thesaurus

  • disdain — ► NOUN ▪ the feeling that someone or something is unworthy of one s consideration or respect. ► VERB ▪ consider with disdain. ORIGIN Old French desdeign, from Latin dedignari consider unworthy …   English terms dictionary

  • Disdain — Dis*dain , v. i. To be filled with scorn; to feel contemptuous anger; to be haughty. [1913 Webster] And when the chief priests and scribes saw the marvels that he did . . . they disdained. Genevan Testament (Matt. xxi. 15). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disdain — I noun abhorrence, abjuration, abnegation, act of despising, act of discrediting, act of loathing, act of scorning, act of shunning, act of spurning, act of taunting, airs, arrogance, contempt, contemptio, contemptuousness, contumeliousness,… …   Law dictionary

  • disdain — [dis dān′] vt. [ME disdeinen < OFr desdaignier < VL * disdignare, for LL dedignare < L dedignari < dis , DIS + dignari: see DEIGN] to regard or treat as unworthy or beneath one s dignity; specif., to refuse or reject with aloof… …   English World dictionary

  • disdain — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ great ▪ utter ▪ obvious ▪ aristocratic, haughty, snobbish, snooty (informal, esp. AmE …   Collocations dictionary

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