Direct process
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. [1913 Webster]

What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. [1913 Webster]

Be even and direct with me. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. [1913 Webster]

He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. [1913 Webster]

5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not {retrograde}; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. [1913 Webster]

6. (Political Science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct action}. (a) (Mach.) See {Direct-acting}. (b) (Trade unions) See {Syndicalism}, below. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct discourse} (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;'' -- correlative to {indirect discourse}, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, {oratio directa}, and {oratio obliqua}.

{Direct evidence} (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to {circumstantial evidence}, or {indirect evidence}. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton.

{Direct examination} (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott.

{Direct fire} (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at.

{Direct process} (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight.

{Direct tax}, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Direct — Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Direct action — Direct Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Direct discourse — Direct Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Direct evidence — Direct Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Direct examination — Direct Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Direct fire — Direct Di*rect , a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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