Direct evidence
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. [1913 Webster]

What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. [1913 Webster]

Be even and direct with me. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. [1913 Webster]

He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. [1913 Webster]

5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not {retrograde}; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. [1913 Webster]

6. (Political Science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct action}. (a) (Mach.) See {Direct-acting}. (b) (Trade unions) See {Syndicalism}, below. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct discourse} (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;'' -- correlative to {indirect discourse}, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, {oratio directa}, and {oratio obliqua}.

{Direct evidence} (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to {circumstantial evidence}, or {indirect evidence}. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton.

{Direct examination} (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott.

{Direct fire} (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at.

{Direct process} (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight.

{Direct tax}, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • direct evidence — see evidence Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. direct evidence n …   Law dictionary

  • Direct evidence — supports the truth of an assertion (in criminal law, an assertion of guilt or of innocence) directly, i.e., without an intervening inference.[1] Circumstantial evidence, by contrast, directly supports the truth of evidence, from which the truth… …   Wikipedia

  • direct evidence — Evidence in form of testimony from a witness who actually saw, heard or touched the subject of questioning. State v. Baker, 249 Or. 549, 438 P.2d 978, 980. Evidence, which if believed, proves existence of fact in issue without inference or… …   Black's law dictionary

  • direct evidence — Evidence in form of testimony from a witness who actually saw, heard or touched the subject of questioning. State v. Baker, 249 Or. 549, 438 P.2d 978, 980. Evidence, which if believed, proves existence of fact in issue without inference or… …   Black's law dictionary

  • direct evidence — noun evidence (usually the testimony of a witness) directly related to the fact in dispute (Freq. 1) • Ant: ↑circumstantial evidence • Topics: ↑law, ↑jurisprudence • Hypernyms: ↑evidence * * * …   Useful english dictionary

  • direct evidence — evidence of a witness who testifies to the truth of the fact to be proved (contrasted with circumstantial evidence). * * * …   Universalium

  • direct evidence — /dəˌrɛkt ˈɛvədəns/ (say duh.rekt evuhduhns) noun evidence of a witness who testifies to the truth of the fact to be proved, having perceived it at first hand. Compare circumstantial evidence …   Australian English dictionary

  • direct evidence — Proof which speaks directly to the issue, requiring no support by other evidence; proof in testimony out of the witness own knowledge, as distinguished from evidence of circumstances from which inferences must be drawn if it is to have probative… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • direct evidence — testimony of a witness concerning the fact to be proved (as opposed to circumstantial evidence) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • evidence — ev·i·dence 1 / e və dəns, ˌdens/ n [Medieval Latin evidentia, from Latin, that which is obvious, from evident evidens clear, obvious, from e out of, from + videns, present participle of videre to see]: something that furnishes or tends to furnish …   Law dictionary

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