Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See {Dress}, and cf. {Dirge}.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. [1913 Webster]

What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. [1913 Webster]

Be even and direct with me. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. [1913 Webster]

He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. [1913 Webster]

5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not {retrograde}; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. [1913 Webster]

6. (Political Science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct action}. (a) (Mach.) See {Direct-acting}. (b) (Trade unions) See {Syndicalism}, below. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Direct discourse} (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;'' -- correlative to {indirect discourse}, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, {oratio directa}, and {oratio obliqua}.

{Direct evidence} (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to {circumstantial evidence}, or {indirect evidence}. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton.

{Direct examination} (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott.

{Direct fire} (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at.

{Direct process} (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight.

{Direct tax}, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • direct — di·rect 1 vt 1: to order with authority the testator direct ed that the car go to his niece 2: to order entry of (a verdict) without jury consideration the court direct ed a verdict in favor of the defendant 3: to act …   Law dictionary

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  • direct — Ⅰ. direct UK US /dɪˈrekt/, /daɪˈrekt/ adjective ► without anyone or anything else being involved or coming between two people or things: »She decided to take direct control of the project. »He had had no direct involvement with the deal. »Have… …   Financial and business terms

  • direct — vb 1 Direct, address, devote, apply are comparable when used reflexively with the meaning to turn or bend one s attention, energies, or abilities to something or when meaning to turn, bend, or point (as one s attention, thoughts, or efforts) to a …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Direct — may refer to: Direct current, a direct flow of electricity Direct examination, the in trial questioning of a witness by the party who has called him or her to testify Direct sum of modules, a construction in abstract algebra which combines… …   Wikipedia

  • direct — direct, ecte (di rèkt, rè kt ; au pluriel masculin l s ne se lie jamais : des avis di rekt et pressants ; la prononciation de la finale ct, cts, au masculin singulier ou pluriel est mal assurée ; on entend quelquefois prononcer di rè, comme… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Direct — Di*rect , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Directed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Directing}.] 1. To arrange in a direct or straight line, as against a mark, or towards a goal; to point; to aim; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance. [1913 Webster] 2. To point… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • direct — [də rekt′; ] also [ dīrekt′] adj. [ME < L directus, pp. of dirigere, to lay straight, direct < di , apart, from + regere, to keep straight, rule: see REGAL] 1. by the shortest way, without turning or stopping; not roundabout; not… …   English World dictionary

  • direct — [adj1] honest absolute, bald, blunt, candid, categorical, downright, explicit, express, forthright, frank, matter of fact, open, outspoken, person to person, plain, plainspoken, point blank, sincere, straight, straightforward, straight from the… …   New thesaurus

  • direct — direct, directly Because direct is an adverb as well as an adjective, it gets in the way of directly, which is an adverb only. Directly is used (1) before an adjective in senses corresponding to those of direct (They were directly responsible for …   Modern English usage

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