Dip of the needle
Dip Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. ``The dip of oars in unison.'' --Glover. [1913 Webster]

2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster]

3. a hollow or depression in a surface, especially in the ground. [PJC]

4. A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon. [Local, U.S.] --Bartlett. [1913 Webster]

5. A dipped candle. [Colloq.] --Marryat. [1913 Webster]

6. A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the performer, resting on his hands, lets his arms bend and his body sink until his chin is level with the bars, and then raises himself by straightening his arms. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

7. In the turpentine industry, the viscid exudation, which is dipped out from incisions in the trees; as, virgin dip (the runnings of the first year), yellow dip (the runnings of subsequent years). [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

8. (A["e]ronautics) A sudden drop followed by a climb, usually to avoid obstacles or as the result of getting into an airhole. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. a liquid, in which objects are soaked by dipping; e.g., a parasiticide or insecticide solution into which animals are dipped (see {sheep-dip}). [PJC]

10. a sauce into which foods are dipped to enhance the flavor; e. g., an {onion dip} made from sour cream and dried onions, into which potato chips are dipped. [PJC]

11. a {pickpocket}. [slang] [PJC]

{Dip of the horizon} (Astron.), the angular depression of the seen or visible horizon below the true or natural horizon; the angle at the eye of an observer between a horizontal line and a tangent drawn from the eye to the surface of the ocean.

{Dip of the needle}, or {Magnetic dip}, the angle formed, in a vertical plane, by a freely suspended magnetic needle, or the line of magnetic force, with a horizontal line; -- called also {inclination}.

{Dip of a stratum} (Geol.), its greatest angle of inclination to the horizon, or that of a line perpendicular to its direction or strike; -- called also the {pitch}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dip of the needle — The angle a balanced magnetic needle makes with the horizontal plane • • • Main Entry: ↑dip …   Useful english dictionary

  • Dip of the horizon — Dip Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. The dip of oars in unison. Glover. [1913 Webster] 2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster] 3. a hollow or depression in a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inclination of the needle — Inclination In cli*na tion, n. [L. inclinatio: cf. F. inclination.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of inclining, or state of being inclined; a leaning; as, an inclination of the head. [1913 Webster] 2. A direction or tendency from the true vertical or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip of a stratum — Dip Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. The dip of oars in unison. Glover. [1913 Webster] 2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster] 3. a hollow or depression in a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Technology of the Dune universe — The technology of the Dune universe is a key aspect of the fictional setting of the Dune series of science fiction novels written by Frank Herbert, and derivative works. Herbert s concepts and inventions have been analyzed and deconstructed in at …   Wikipedia

  • Ship of the line — Line Line, n. [OE. line, AS. l[=i]ne cable, hawser, prob. from L. linea a linen thread, string, line, fr. linum flax, thread, linen, cable; but the English word was influenced by F. ligne line, from the same L. word linea. See {Linen}.] 1. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip — Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. The dip of oars in unison. Glover. [1913 Webster] 2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster] 3. a hollow or depression in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip circle — Beside James Clark Ross is a dip circle designed by Robert Were Fox, and used by Ross to discover the magnetic south pole. Dip circles are used to measure the angle between the horizon and the Earth s magnetic field (the dip angle). They were… …   Wikipedia

  • dip needle — /ˈdɪp nidl/ (say dip needl) noun an instrument for measuring dip (def. 27) consisting of a magnetised needle suspended on a horizontal pivot and a counter arm to control the sensitivity and position of the needle. Also, dip circle, dipping needle …   Australian English dictionary

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