Magnetic Mag*net"ic, Magnetical Mag*net"ic*al, a. [L. magneticus: cf. F. magn['e]tique.] 1. Pertaining to the magnet; possessing the properties of the magnet, or corresponding properties; as, a magnetic bar of iron; a magnetic needle. [1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to, or characterized by, the earth's magnetism; as, the magnetic north; the magnetic meridian. [1913 Webster]

3. Capable of becoming a magnet; susceptible to magnetism; as, the magnetic metals. [1913 Webster]

4. Endowed with extraordinary personal power to excite the feelings and to win the affections; attractive; inducing attachment. [1913 Webster]

She that had all magnetic force alone. --Donne. [1913 Webster]

5. Having, susceptible to, or induced by, animal magnetism, so called; hypnotic; as, a magnetic sleep. See {Magnetism}. [Archaic] [1913 Webster +PJC]

{Magnetic amplitude}, {attraction}, {dip}, {induction}, etc. See under {Amplitude}, {Attraction}, etc.

{Magnetic battery}, a combination of bar or horseshoe magnets with the like poles adjacent, so as to act together with great power.

{Magnetic compensator}, a contrivance connected with a ship's compass for compensating or neutralizing the effect of the iron of the ship upon the needle.

{Magnetic curves}, curves indicating lines of magnetic force, as in the arrangement of iron filings between the poles of a powerful magnet.

{Magnetic elements}. (a) (Chem. Physics) Those elements, as iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, etc., which are capable or becoming magnetic. (b) (Physics) In respect to terrestrial magnetism, the declination, inclination, and intensity. (c) See under {Element}.

{Magnetic fluid}, the hypothetical fluid whose existence was formerly assumed in the explanations of the phenomena of magnetism; -- no longer considered a meaningful concept.

{Magnetic iron}, or {Magnetic iron ore}. (Min.) Same as {Magnetite}.

{Magnetic needle}, a slender bar of steel, magnetized and suspended at its center on a sharp-pointed pivot, or by a delicate fiber, so that it may take freely the direction of the magnetic meridian. It constitutes the essential part of a compass, such as the mariner's and the surveyor's.

{Magnetic poles}, the two points in the opposite polar regions of the earth at which the direction of the dipping needle is vertical.

{Magnetic pyrites}. See {Pyrrhotite}.

{Magnetic storm} (Terrestrial Physics), a disturbance of the earth's magnetic force characterized by great and sudden changes.

{Magnetic telegraph}, a telegraph acting by means of a magnet. See {Telegraph}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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