Digress
Digress Di*gress", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Digressed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Digressing}.] [L. digressus, p. p. of digredi to go apart, to deviate; di- = dis- + gradi to step, walk. See {Grade}.] 1. To step or turn aside; to deviate; to swerve; especially, to turn aside from the main subject of attention, or course of argument, in writing or speaking. [1913 Webster]

Moreover she beginneth to digress in latitude. --Holland. [1913 Webster]

In the pursuit of an argument there is hardly room to digress into a particular definition as often as a man varies the signification of any term. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. To turn aside from the right path; to transgress; to offend. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Thy abundant goodness shall excuse This deadly blot on thy digressing son. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • Digress — Di*gress , n. Digression. [Obs.] Fuller. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • digress — I verb aberrare, alter course, be diffuse, branch out, change direction, depart, detour, deviate, digredi, divagate, divaricate, diverge, divert, drift, expatiate, fly off at a tangent, go astray, meander, ramble, rove, shift, sidestep, sidetrack …   Law dictionary

  • digress — 1520s, from L. digressus, pp. of digredi to go aside, depart (see DIGRESSION (Cf. digression)), or perhaps a back formation from digression. Related: Digressed; digressing …   Etymology dictionary

  • digress — deviate, diverge, depart, *swerve, veer Analogous words: *wander, stray …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • digress — [v] stray, deviate aberrate, beat about the bush*, be diffuse, circumlocute, depart, divagate, drift, excurse, get off the point, get off the subject, get sidetracked, go by way of*, go off on a tangent*, long way*, meander, ramble, roam, swerve …   New thesaurus

  • digress — ► VERB ▪ leave the main subject temporarily in speech or writing. DERIVATIVES digression noun digressive adjective. ORIGIN Latin digredi step away …   English terms dictionary

  • digress — [di gres′, dīgres′] vi. [< L digressus, pp. of digredi, to go apart < dis , apart + gradi, to go, step: see GRADE] to turn aside; esp., to depart temporarily from the main subject in talking or writing; ramble SYN. DEVIATE …   English World dictionary

  • digress — UK [daɪˈɡres] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms digress : present tense I/you/we/they digress he/she/it digresses present participle digressing past tense digressed past participle digressed if you digress from a subject, you start to talk or… …   English dictionary

  • digress — v. (D; intr.) to digress from * * * [d(a)ɪ gres] (D; intr.) to digress from …   Combinatory dictionary

  • digress — digresser, n. digressingly, adv. /di gres , duy /, v.i. 1. to deviate or wander away from the main topic or purpose in speaking or writing; depart from the principal line of argument, plot, study, etc. 2. Archaic. to turn aside. [1520 30; < L… …   Universalium

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