dight
clothed clothed adj. 1. wearing clothing. [Narrower terms: {adorned(predicate), bedecked(predicate), decked(predicate), decked out(predicate)}; {appareled, attired, clad, dressed, garbed, garmented, habilimented, robed}; {arrayed, panoplied}; {breeched, pantalooned, trousered}; {bundled-up}; {caparisoned}; {cassocked}: {costumed}: {decent}] [Narrower terms: {dight}] [Narrower terms: {dressed-up, dressed to the nines(predicate), dressed to kill(predicate), dolled up, spruced up, spiffed up}] [Narrower terms: {gowned}] [Narrower terms: {habited}] [Narrower terms: {heavy-coated}] [Narrower terms: {overdressed}] [Narrower terms: {petticoated}] [Narrower terms: {red-coated, lobster-backed}] [Narrower terms: {surpliced}] [Narrower terms: {togged dressed esp in smart clothes)}] [Narrower terms: {turned out}] [Narrower terms: {underdressed}] [Narrower terms: {uniformed}] [Narrower terms: {vestmented}] Also See: {adorned}, {decorated}. Antonym: {unclothed}. [WordNet 1.5]

2. covered with or as if with clothes or a wrap or cloak. fog-cloaked meadows

Syn: cloaked, draped, mantled, wrapped. [WordNet 1.5]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dight — (d[imac]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dight} or {Dighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dighting}.] [OF. dihten, AS. dihtan to dictate, command, dispose, arrange, fr. L. dictare to say often, dictate, order; cf. G. dichten to write poetry, fr. L. dictare. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dight — (d[imac]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dight} or {Dighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dighting}.] [OF. dihten, AS. dihtan to dictate, command, dispose, arrange, fr. L. dictare to say often, dictate, order; cf. G. dichten to write poetry, fr. L. dictare. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dight — to adorn (archaic or poetic), O.E. dihtan dictate, appoint, ordain; guide; compose, an early borrowing from L. dictare to dictate (see DICTATE (Cf. dictate) (v.)). The Latin word borrowed even earlier into continental Germanic became O.H.G.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • dight — [dīt] vt. dight or dighted, dighting [ME dihten < OE dihtan, to arrange, dispose, make < L dictare, to say: see DICTATE] Archaic 1. to adorn 2. to equip …   English World dictionary

  • Dight — This is one of the most interesting and unusual names on the English register, it derives from the pre 10th Century word dihtan meaning to equip and is job descriptive for the Armourer or body servant responsible for dressing the knight prior to… …   Surnames reference

  • dight — be·dight; ben·e·dight; dight; …   English syllables

  • dight — [[t]daɪt[/t]] v. t. dight dight•ed, dight•ing archaic to adorn • Etymology: bef. 1000; ME; OE dihtan to arrange, compose < L dīctāre (see dictate) …   From formal English to slang

  • dight —  1) to dight, to foul or dirty one. Chesh. Perhaps used ironically.  2) to dight, to clean or dress ; Dight the snivel from your neb, blow your nose. Cumb.  3) (pronounced [DEBT] in Cheshire and York, West Riding), means dirtied, daubed, &c …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • dight — transitive verb (dighted or dight; dighting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dihtan to arrange, compose, from Latin dictare to dictate, compose Date: 13th century archaic dress, adorn …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • dight — /duyt/, v.t., dight or dighted, dighting. Archaic. to dress; adorn. [bef. 1000; ME dighten, OE dihtan to arrange, compose < L dictare (see DICTATE); c. G dichten] * * * …   Universalium

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