Diffract Dif*fract", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Diffracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Diffracting}.] [L. diffractus, p. p. of diffringere to break in pieces; dif- = dis- + frangere to break. See {Fracture}.] To break or separate into parts; to deflect, or decompose by deflection, a? rays of light. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • diffract — 1803, perhaps a back formation from DIFFRACTION (Cf. diffraction). Related: Diffracted; diffracting …   Etymology dictionary

  • diffract — [di frakt′] vt. [< L diffractus, pp. of diffringere, to break in pieces < dis , apart + frangere, BREAK] to subject to diffraction …   English World dictionary

  • diffract — [dɪ frakt] verb Physics cause to undergo diffraction. Derivatives diffractive adjective diffractively adverb Origin C19: from L. diffract , diffringere break in pieces …   English new terms dictionary

  • diffract — diffraction ► NOUN Physics ▪ the process by which a beam of light or other system of waves is spread out as a result of passing through a narrow aperture or across an edge. DERIVATIVES diffract verb diffractive adjective. ORIGIN Latin, from… …   English terms dictionary

  • diffract — v.tr. Physics (of the edge of an opaque body, a narrow slit, etc.) break up (a beam of light) into a series of dark or light bands or coloured spectra, or (a beam of radiation or particles) into a series of alternately high and low intensities.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • diffract — transitive verb Etymology: back formation from diffraction Date: 1803 to cause to undergo diffraction …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • diffract — /di frakt /, v.t. to break up or bend by diffraction. [1795 1805; back formation from DIFFRACTION] * * * …   Universalium

  • diffract — verb a) To cause diffraction b) To undergo diffraction …   Wiktionary

  • diffract — dif·fract dif rakt vt to cause to undergo diffraction …   Medical dictionary

  • diffract — dif|fract [dıˈfrækt] v [T] technical to bend light or sound waves as they pass around something or through a hole →↑refract >diffraction [dıˈfrækʃən] n [U] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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