Dictate
Dictate Dic"tate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dictated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dictating}.] [L. dictatus, p. p. of dictare, freq. of dicere to say. See {Diction}, and cf. {Dight}.] 1. To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; as, to dictate a letter to an amanuensis. [1913 Webster]

The mind which dictated the Iliad. --Wayland. [1913 Webster]

Pages dictated by the Holy Spirit. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To say; to utter; to communicate authoritatively; to deliver (a command) to a subordinate; to declare with authority; to impose; as, to dictate the terms of a treaty; a general dictates orders to his troops. [1913 Webster]

Whatsoever is dictated to us by God must be believed. --Watts.

Syn: To suggest; prescribe; enjoin; command; point out; urge; admonish. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:
, , , , , , , , , , , / (so that another may repeat or write), , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • dictate — vb Dictate, prescribe, ordain, decree, impose mean to lay down expressly something to be followed, observed, obeyed, or accepted. Dictate implies an authoritative direction by or as if by the spoken word which serves in governing or guiding one s …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Dictate — Dic tate, v. i. 1. To speak as a superior; to command; to impose conditions (on). [1913 Webster] Who presumed to dictate to the sovereign. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. To compose literary works; to tell what shall be written or said by another.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dictate — [n] command; rule behest, bidding, code, decree, dictum, direction, edict, fiat, injunction, law, mandate, order, ordinance, precept, principle, requirement, statute, ultimatum, word; concepts 274,318,688 Ant. request dictate [v1] command; give… …   New thesaurus

  • Dictate — Dic tate, n. [L. dictatum. See {Dictate}, v. t.] A statement delivered with authority; an order; a command; an authoritative rule, principle, or maxim; a prescription; as, listen to the dictates of your conscience; the dictates of the gospel.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dictate — I noun act, authoritative suggestion, behest, charge, command, commandment, commission, decree, demand, direction, edict, enactment, fiat, imperative, imperious direction, injunction, instruction, judgment, law, mandate, order, ordinance,… …   Law dictionary

  • dictate — is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable as a noun (as in the dictates of conscience) and with the stress on the second syllable as a verb (as in dictate a letter) …   Modern English usage

  • Dictate — can refer to: Dictation (disambiguation) Dictator Edict This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point direc …   Wikipedia

  • dictate — ► VERB 1) state or order authoritatively. 2) say or read aloud (words to be typed or written down). 3) control or determine. ► NOUN ▪ an order or principle that must be obeyed. DERIVATIVES dictation noun …   English terms dictionary

  • dictate — [dik′tāt΄; ] also, for v. [ dik tāt′] vt., vi. dictated, dictating [< L dictatus, pp. of dictare, freq. of dicere, to speak: see DICTION] 1. to speak or read (something) aloud for someone else to write down 2. to prescribe or command… …   English World dictionary

  • dictate — dic|tate1 [dıkˈteıt US ˈdıkteıt] v [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: dictare to say often, say firmly , from dicere to say ] 1.) [I and T] to say words for someone else to write down dictate a letter/memo etc to sb ▪ She s dictating a letter to… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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