Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus {Pinus}. See {Pinus}. [1913 Webster]

Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the {white pine} ({Pinus Strobus}), the {Georgia pine} ({Pinus australis}), the {red pine} ({Pinus resinosa}), and the great West Coast {sugar pine} ({Pinus Lambertiana}) are among the most valuable. The {Scotch pine} or {fir}, also called {Norway} or {Riga pine} ({Pinus sylvestris}), is the only British species. The {nut pine} is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See {Pinon}. [1913 Webster] The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. [1913 Webster]

2. The wood of the pine tree. [1913 Webster]

3. A pineapple. [1913 Webster]

{Ground pine}. (Bot.) See under {Ground}.

{Norfolk Island pine} (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the {Araucaria excelsa}.

{Pine barren}, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.]

{Pine borer} (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees.

{Pine finch}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Pinefinch}, in the Vocabulary.

{Pine grosbeak} (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak ({Pinicola enucleator}), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red.

{Pine lizard} (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard ({Sceloporus undulatus}), native of the Middle States; -- called also {swift}, {brown scorpion}, and {alligator}.

{Pine marten}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel ({Mustela martes}), called also {sweet marten}, and {yellow-breasted marten}. (b) The American sable. See {Sable}.

{Pine moth} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus {Retinia}, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage.

{Pine mouse} (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse ({Arvicola pinetorum}), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests.

{Pine needle} (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See {Pinus}.

{Pine-needle wool}. See {Pine wool} (below).

{Pine oil}, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors.

{Pine snake} (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake ({Pituophis melanoleucus}). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also {bull snake}. The Western pine snake ({Pituophis Sayi}) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange.

{Pine tree} (Bot.), a tree of the genus {Pinus}; pine.

{Pine-tree money}, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. The most noted variety is the {pine tree shilling}.

{Pine weevil} (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera {Pissodes}, {Hylobius}, etc.

{Pine wool}, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also {pine-needle wool}, and {pine-wood wool}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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