All the same
All All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. ``And cheeks all pale.'' --Byron. [1913 Webster]

Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this word retains its appropriate sense or becomes intensive. [1913 Webster]

2. Even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.) [Obs. or Poet.] [1913 Webster]

All as his straying flock he fed. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

A damsel lay deploring All on a rock reclined. --Gay. [1913 Webster]

{All to}, or {All-to}. In such phrases as ``all to rent,'' ``all to break,'' ``all-to frozen,'' etc., which are of frequent occurrence in our old authors, the all and the to have commonly been regarded as forming a compound adverb, equivalent in meaning to entirely, completely, altogether. But the sense of entireness lies wholly in the word all (as it does in ``all forlorn,'' and similar expressions), and the to properly belongs to the following word, being a kind of intensive prefix (orig. meaning asunder and answering to the LG. ter-, HG. zer-). It is frequently to be met with in old books, used without the all. Thus Wyclif says, ``The vail of the temple was to rent:'' and of Judas, ``He was hanged and to-burst the middle:'' i. e., burst in two, or asunder.

{All along}. See under {Along}.

{All and some}, individually and collectively, one and all. [Obs.] ``Displeased all and some.'' --Fairfax.

{All but}. (a) Scarcely; not even. [Obs.] --Shak. (b) Almost; nearly. ``The fine arts were all but proscribed.'' --Macaulay.

{All hollow}, entirely, completely; as, to beat any one all hollow. [Low]

{All one}, the same thing in effect; that is, wholly the same thing.

{All over}, over the whole extent; thoroughly; wholly; as, she is her mother all over. [Colloq.]

{All the better}, wholly the better; that is, better by the whole difference.

{All the same}, nevertheless. ``There they [certain phenomena] remain rooted all the same, whether we recognize them or not.'' --J. C. Shairp. ``But Rugby is a very nice place all the same.'' --T. Arnold. -- See also under {All}, n. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • all the same — or just the same phrasal despite everything ; nevertheless …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • all the same(2) — or[just the same] {adv. phr.}, {informal} As if the opposite were so; nevertheless; anyway; anyhow; still. * /Everyone opposed it, but Sally and Bob got married all the same./ * /Mary is deaf, but she takes tap dancing lessons just the same./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all the same(2) — or[just the same] {adv. phr.}, {informal} As if the opposite were so; nevertheless; anyway; anyhow; still. * /Everyone opposed it, but Sally and Bob got married all the same./ * /Mary is deaf, but she takes tap dancing lessons just the same./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all the same(1) — or[all one] {n. phr.} Something that makes no difference; a choice that you don t care about. * /If it s all the same to you, I would like to be waited on first./ * /You can get there by car or by bus it s all one./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all the same(1) — or[all one] {n. phr.} Something that makes no difference; a choice that you don t care about. * /If it s all the same to you, I would like to be waited on first./ * /You can get there by car or by bus it s all one./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • All horses are the same color — The horse paradox is a falsidical paradox that arises from flawed demonstrations, which purport to use mathematical induction, of the statement All horses are the same color . The paradox does not truly exist, as these arguments have a crucial… …   Wikipedia

  • All the better — All All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. And cheeks all pale. Byron. [1913 Webster] Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Song Remains the Same (film) — Infobox Film name = The Song Remains the Same caption = director = Peter Clifton Joe Massot producer = Peter Grant writer = starring = John Bonham John Paul Jones Jimmy Page Robert Plant music = Led Zeppelin cinematography = Ernest Day editing =… …   Wikipedia

  • The Song Remains the Same (album) — Infobox Album Name = The Song Remains the Same Type = live Artist = Led Zeppelin Released = September 28, 1976 Recorded = July 27, 1973 – July 29, 1973 at Madison Square Garden, New York Length = 99:45 (original album) / 131:55 (2007 edition)… …   Wikipedia

  • All the President's Men — Infobox Book name = All the President s Men image caption = The cover of the 1974 first edition. author = Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward country = USA language = English publisher = Simon Schuster release date = 1974 english release date = media …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”