Deriding
Deride De*ride", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Derided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deriding}.] [L. deridere, derisum; de- + rid?re to laugh. See {Ridicule}.] To laugh at with contempt; to laugh to scorn; to turn to ridicule or make sport of; to mock; to scoff at. [1913 Webster]

And the Pharisees, also, . . . derided him. --Luke xvi. 14. [1913 Webster]

Sport that wrinkled Care derides. And Laughter holding both his sides. --Milton.

Syn: To mock; laugh at; ridicule; insult; taunt; jeer; banter; rally.

Usage: To {Deride}, {Ridicule}, {Mock}, {Taunt}. A man may ridicule without any unkindness of feeling; his object may be to correct; as, to ridicule the follies of the age. He who derides is actuated by a severe a contemptuous spirit; as, to deride one for his religious principles. To mock is stronger, and denotes open and scornful derision; as, to mock at sin. To taunt is to reproach with the keenest insult; as, to taunt one for his misfortunes. Ridicule consists more in words than in actions; derision and mockery evince themselves in actions as well as words; taunts are always expressed in words of extreme bitterness. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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