All over
Over O"ver, adv. 1. From one side to another; from side to side; across; crosswise; as, a board, or a tree, a foot over, i. e., a foot in diameter. [1913 Webster]

2. From one person or place to another regarded as on the opposite side of a space or barrier; -- used with verbs of motion; as, to sail over to England; to hand over the money; to go over to the enemy. ``We will pass over to Gibeah.'' --Judges xix. 12. Also, with verbs of being: At, or on, the opposite side; as, the boat is over. [1913 Webster]

3. From beginning to end; throughout the course, extent, or expanse of anything; as, to look over accounts, or a stock of goods; a dress covered over with jewels. [1913 Webster]

4. From inside to outside, above or across the brim. [1913 Webster]

Good measure, pressed down . . . and running over. --Luke vi. 38. [1913 Webster]

5. Beyond a limit; hence, in excessive degree or quantity; superfluously; with repetition; as, to do the whole work over. ``So over violent.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

He that gathered much had nothing over. --Ex. xvi. 18. [1913 Webster]

6. In a manner to bring the under side to or towards the top; as, to turn (one's self) over; to roll a stone over; to turn over the leaves; to tip over a cart. [1913 Webster]

7. Completed; at an end; beyond the limit of continuance; finished; as, when will the play be over?. ``Their distress was over.'' --Macaulay. ``The feast was over.'' --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

Note: Over, out, off, and similar adverbs, are often used in the predicate with the sense and force of adjectives, agreeing in this respect with the adverbs of place, here, there, everywhere, nowhere; as, the games were over; the play is over; the master was out; his hat is off. [1913 Webster]

Note: Over is much used in composition, with the same significations that it has as a separate word; as in overcast, overflow, to cast or flow so as to spread over or cover; overhang, to hang above; overturn, to turn so as to bring the underside towards the top; overact, overreach, to act or reach beyond, implying excess or superiority. [1913 Webster]

{All over}. (a) Over the whole; upon all parts; completely; as, he is spatterd with mud all over. (b) Wholly over; at an end; as, it is all over with him.

{Over again}, once more; with repetition; afresh; anew. --Dryden.

{Over against}, opposite; in front. --Addison.

{Over and above}, in a manner, or degree, beyond what is supposed, defined, or usual; besides; in addition; as, not over and above well. ``He . . . gained, over and above, the good will of all people.'' --L' Estrange.

{Over and over}, repeatedly; again and again.

{To boil over}. See under {Boil}, v. i.

{To come it over}, {To do over}, {To give over}, etc. See under {Come}, {Do}, {Give}, etc.

{To throw over}, to abandon; to betray. Cf. {To throw overboard}, under {Overboard}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • all over — {adv. phr.} 1. In every part; everywhere. * /He has a fever and aches all over./ * /I have looked all over for my glasses./ Compare: FAR AND WIDE. 2. {informal} In every way; completely. * /She is her mother all over./ 3. {informal} Coming into… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all over — {adv. phr.} 1. In every part; everywhere. * /He has a fever and aches all over./ * /I have looked all over for my glasses./ Compare: FAR AND WIDE. 2. {informal} In every way; completely. * /She is her mother all over./ 3. {informal} Coming into… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • All over — All All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. And cheeks all pale. Byron. [1913 Webster] Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • All over — Le all over est un terme de peinture apparu vers 1948. Chaque coup de pinceau annule le précédent et le rapport de celui ci avec la surface du fond. Cette technique a été apportée par Jackson Pollock en 1945 avec ses drippings. Procédé qui… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • all-over — (adj.) covering every part, 1859, from ALL (Cf. all) + OVER (Cf. over). All overish generally, indefinitely indisposed is from 1820 …   Etymology dictionary

  • all-over — adj. 1. covering the entire surface. an all over pattern Syn: allover. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • all over — index throughout (all over) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • All-over-... — 〈[ɔ:loʊvə(r)] in Zus.〉 gänzlich, ganzflächig, z. B. All over Musterung [engl.] …   Universal-Lexikon

  • all-over — all ,over adjective covering the surface of something completely: an all over tan …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • all over — (again) another time, starting from the beginning. I cleaned the kitchen, the dogs tracked in mud, and I had to do it all over …   New idioms dictionary

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