All one
All All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. ``And cheeks all pale.'' --Byron. [1913 Webster]

Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this word retains its appropriate sense or becomes intensive. [1913 Webster]

2. Even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.) [Obs. or Poet.] [1913 Webster]

All as his straying flock he fed. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

A damsel lay deploring All on a rock reclined. --Gay. [1913 Webster]

{All to}, or {All-to}. In such phrases as ``all to rent,'' ``all to break,'' ``all-to frozen,'' etc., which are of frequent occurrence in our old authors, the all and the to have commonly been regarded as forming a compound adverb, equivalent in meaning to entirely, completely, altogether. But the sense of entireness lies wholly in the word all (as it does in ``all forlorn,'' and similar expressions), and the to properly belongs to the following word, being a kind of intensive prefix (orig. meaning asunder and answering to the LG. ter-, HG. zer-). It is frequently to be met with in old books, used without the all. Thus Wyclif says, ``The vail of the temple was to rent:'' and of Judas, ``He was hanged and to-burst the middle:'' i. e., burst in two, or asunder.

{All along}. See under {Along}.

{All and some}, individually and collectively, one and all. [Obs.] ``Displeased all and some.'' --Fairfax.

{All but}. (a) Scarcely; not even. [Obs.] --Shak. (b) Almost; nearly. ``The fine arts were all but proscribed.'' --Macaulay.

{All hollow}, entirely, completely; as, to beat any one all hollow. [Low]

{All one}, the same thing in effect; that is, wholly the same thing.

{All over}, over the whole extent; thoroughly; wholly; as, she is her mother all over. [Colloq.]

{All the better}, wholly the better; that is, better by the whole difference.

{All the same}, nevertheless. ``There they [certain phenomena] remain rooted all the same, whether we recognize them or not.'' --J. C. Shairp. ``But Rugby is a very nice place all the same.'' --T. Arnold. -- See also under {All}, n. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • All one — One One (w[u^]n), a. [OE. one, on, an, AS. [=a]n; akin to D. een, OS. [=e]n, OFries. [=e]n, [=a]n, G. ein, Dan. een, Sw. en, Icel. einn, Goth. ains, W. un, Ir. & Gael. aon, L. unus, earlier oinos, oenos, Gr. o i nh the ace on dice; cf. Skr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • all one — noun A matter of indifference; a matter having no importance or consequence. But what care I? I care not an she were a black a moor; tis all one to me …   Wiktionary

  • All one polynomial — An all one polynomial (AOP) is a polynomial used in finite fields, specifically GF(2) (binary). The AOP is a 1 equally spaced polynomial.An AOP of degree m has all terms from x m to x 0 with coefficients of 1, and can be written as:AOP(x) = sum… …   Wikipedia

  • all one's eggs in one basket — noun a) The state of having invested heavily in just one area the stock market decline wouldn’t have hurt him so badly if he hadn’t had all his eggs in one basket b) The state of having devoted all of one’s resources to one thing at his age he… …   Wiktionary

  • put all one's eggs in one basket — {v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too soon./ * /To buy stock in a single company is to put all your eggs in one basket./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put all one's eggs in one basket — {v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too soon./ * /To buy stock in a single company is to put all your eggs in one basket./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • With all one's heart — Heart Heart (h[aum]rt), n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel. hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[ i]rt[=o], Lith. szirdis, Russ. serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. kardi a, kh^r.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • have all one's buttons — or[have all one s marbles] {v. phr.}, {slang} To have all your understanding; be reasonable. Usually used in the negative or conditionally. * /Mike acts sometimes as if he didn t have all his buttons./ * /He would not go to town barefooted if he… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • have all one's buttons — or[have all one s marbles] {v. phr.}, {slang} To have all your understanding; be reasonable. Usually used in the negative or conditionally. * /Mike acts sometimes as if he didn t have all his buttons./ * /He would not go to town barefooted if he… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • With all one's might and main — Main Main, n. [AS. m[ae]gen strength, power, force; akin to OHG. magan, Icel. megin, and to E. may, v. [root]103. See {May}, v.] 1. Strength; force; might; violent effort. [Obs., except in certain phrases.] [1913 Webster] There were in this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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