All one
One One (w[u^]n), a. [OE. one, on, an, AS. [=a]n; akin to D. een, OS. [=e]n, OFries. [=e]n, [=a]n, G. ein, Dan. een, Sw. en, Icel. einn, Goth. ains, W. un, Ir. & Gael. aon, L. unus, earlier oinos, oenos, Gr. o'i`nh the ace on dice; cf. Skr. [=e]ka. The same word as the indefinite article a, an. [root] 299. Cf. 2d {A}, 1st {An}, {Alone}, {Anon}, {Any}, {None}, {Nonce}, {Only}, {Onion}, {Unit}.] 1. Being a single unit, or entire being or thing, and no more; not multifold; single; individual. [1913 Webster]

The dream of Pharaoh is one. --Gen. xli. 25. [1913 Webster]

O that we now had here But one ten thousand of those men in England. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Denoting a person or thing conceived or spoken of indefinitely; a certain. ``I am the sister of one Claudio'' [--Shak.], that is, of a certain man named Claudio. [1913 Webster]

3. Pointing out a contrast, or denoting a particular thing or person different from some other specified; -- used as a correlative adjective, with or without the. [1913 Webster]

From the one side of heaven unto the other. --Deut. iv. 32. [1913 Webster]

4. Closely bound together; undivided; united; constituting a whole. [1913 Webster]

The church is therefore one, though the members may be many. --Bp. Pearson [1913 Webster]

5. Single in kind; the same; a common. [1913 Webster]

One plague was on you all, and on your lords. --1 Sam. vi. 4. [1913 Webster]

6. Single; unmarried. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Men may counsel a woman to be one. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: One is often used in forming compound words, the meaning of which is obvious; as, one-armed, one-celled, one-eyed, one-handed, one-hearted, one-horned, one-idead, one-leaved, one-masted, one-ribbed, one-story, one-syllable, one-stringed, one-winged, etc. [1913 Webster]

{All one}, of the same or equal nature, or consequence; all the same; as, he says that it is all one what course you take. --Shak.

{One day}. (a) On a certain day, not definitely specified, referring to time past. [1913 Webster]

One day when Phoebe fair, With all her band, was following the chase. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] (b) Referring to future time: At some uncertain day or period in the future; some day. [1913 Webster]

Well, I will marry one day. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • All one — All All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. And cheeks all pale. Byron. [1913 Webster] Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • all one — noun A matter of indifference; a matter having no importance or consequence. But what care I? I care not an she were a black a moor; tis all one to me …   Wiktionary

  • All one polynomial — An all one polynomial (AOP) is a polynomial used in finite fields, specifically GF(2) (binary). The AOP is a 1 equally spaced polynomial.An AOP of degree m has all terms from x m to x 0 with coefficients of 1, and can be written as:AOP(x) = sum… …   Wikipedia

  • all one's eggs in one basket — noun a) The state of having invested heavily in just one area the stock market decline wouldn’t have hurt him so badly if he hadn’t had all his eggs in one basket b) The state of having devoted all of one’s resources to one thing at his age he… …   Wiktionary

  • put all one's eggs in one basket — {v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too soon./ * /To buy stock in a single company is to put all your eggs in one basket./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put all one's eggs in one basket — {v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too soon./ * /To buy stock in a single company is to put all your eggs in one basket./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • With all one's heart — Heart Heart (h[aum]rt), n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel. hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[ i]rt[=o], Lith. szirdis, Russ. serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. kardi a, kh^r.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • have all one's buttons — or[have all one s marbles] {v. phr.}, {slang} To have all your understanding; be reasonable. Usually used in the negative or conditionally. * /Mike acts sometimes as if he didn t have all his buttons./ * /He would not go to town barefooted if he… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • have all one's buttons — or[have all one s marbles] {v. phr.}, {slang} To have all your understanding; be reasonable. Usually used in the negative or conditionally. * /Mike acts sometimes as if he didn t have all his buttons./ * /He would not go to town barefooted if he… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • With all one's might and main — Main Main, n. [AS. m[ae]gen strength, power, force; akin to OHG. magan, Icel. megin, and to E. may, v. [root]103. See {May}, v.] 1. Strength; force; might; violent effort. [Obs., except in certain phrases.] [1913 Webster] There were in this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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