Depth Depth (s[e^]pth), n. [From {Deep}; akin to D. diepte, Icel. d[=y]pt, d[=y]p[eth], Goth. diupi[thorn]a.] 1. The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops. [1913 Webster]

2. Profoundness; extent or degree of intensity; abundance; completeness; as, depth of knowledge, or color. [1913 Webster]

Mindful of that heavenly love Which knows no end in depth or height. --Keble. [1913 Webster]

3. Lowness; as, depth of sound. [1913 Webster]

4. That which is deep; a deep, or the deepest, part or place; the deep; the middle part; as, the depth of night, or of winter. [1913 Webster]

From you unclouded depth above. --Keble. [1913 Webster]

The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. [1913 Webster]

5. (Logic) The number of simple elements which an abstract conception or notion includes; the comprehension or content. [1913 Webster]

6. (Horology) A pair of toothed wheels which work together. [R.] [1913 Webster]

7. (A["e]ronautics) The perpendicular distance from the chord to the farthest point of an arched surface. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

8. (Computers) the maximum number of times a type of procedure is reiteratively called before the last call is exited; -- of subroutines or procedures which are reentrant; -- used of call stacks. [PJC]

{Depth of a sail} (Naut.), the extent of a square sail from the head rope to the foot rope; the length of the after leach of a staysail or boom sail; -- commonly called the {drop of a sail}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • depth — [ depθ ] noun *** ▸ 1 distance through something ▸ 2 hidden qualities/ideas ▸ 3 information/importance ▸ 4 bright quality of color ▸ 5 not looking flat ▸ 6 when sound is low ▸ 7 deepest parts of ocean ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) count or uncount the… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • depth — W3S3 [depθ] n [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: deep] 1.) [C usually singular, U] a) the distance from the top surface of something such as a river or hole to the bottom of it →↑deep ▪ a sea with an average depth of 35 metres to/at a depth of sth ▪ The… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Depth — Depth(s) may refer to: Depth (ring theory), an important invariant of rings and modules in commutative and homological algebra Depth in a well, the measurement between two points in an oil well Color depth (or number of bits or bit depth ) in… …   Wikipedia

  • depth — [depth] n. [ME depthe < dep: see DEEP & TH1] 1. a) the distance from the top downward, from the surface inward, or from front to back b) perspective, as in a painting 2. the quality or condition of being deep; deepness; specif …   English World dictionary

  • depth — depth; depth·ing; depth·less; depth·om·e·ter; …   English syllables

  • depth — ► NOUN 1) the distance from the top down, from the surface inwards, or from front to back. 2) complexity and profundity of thought: the book has unexpected depth. 3) comprehensiveness of study or detail. 4) creditable intensity of emotion. 5)… …   English terms dictionary

  • depth — [n1] distance down or across base, bottom, declination, deepness, draft, drop, expanse, extent, fathomage, intensity, lower register, lowness, measure, measurement, pit, pitch, profoundness, profundity, remoteness, sounding; concepts 737,790 Ant …   New thesaurus

  • depth — index caliber (mental capacity), sense (intelligence) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • depth — late 14c., apparently formed in M.E. on model of length, breadth; from O.E. deop deep (see DEEP (Cf. deep)) + TH (Cf. th). Replaced older deopnes deepness. Though the English word is relatively recent, the formation is in P.Gmc., *deupitho , and… …   Etymology dictionary

  • depth — noun 1 distance from top to bottom or from back to front; deep part of sth ADJECTIVE ▪ considerable, great ▪ species that live at considerable depth ▪ They go down to great depths below the surface. ▪ maximum …   Collocations dictionary

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