Deprive
Deprive De*prive", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deprived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Depriving}.] [LL. deprivare, deprivatium, to divest of office; L. de- + privare to bereave, deprive: cf. OF. depriver. See {Private}.] 1. To take away; to put an end; to destroy. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

'Tis honor to deprive dishonored life. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To dispossess; to bereave; to divest; to hinder from possessing; to debar; to shut out from; -- with a remoter object, usually preceded by of. [1913 Webster]

God hath deprived her of wisdom. --Job xxxix. 17. [1913 Webster]

It was seldom that anger deprived him of power over himself. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. To divest of office; to depose; to dispossess of dignity, especially ecclesiastical. [1913 Webster]

A minister deprived for inconformity. --Bacon.

Syn: To strip; despoil; rob; abridge. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • deprive — de·prive vt de·prived, de·priv·ing: to take away or withhold something from no person shall...be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law U.S. Constitution amend. V dep·ri·va·tion /ˌde prə vā shən, ˌdē ˌprī / n Merriam… …   Law dictionary

  • deprive — [dē prīv′, diprīv′] vt. deprived, depriving [ME depriven < ML(Ec) deprivare < L de , intens. + privare, to deprive, separate: see PRIVATE] 1. to take something away from forcibly; dispossess [to deprive someone of his property] 2. to keep… …   English World dictionary

  • deprive — ► VERB ▪ prevent from possessing, using, or enjoying something: the city was deprived of its water supply. ORIGIN Latin deprivare, from privare bereave, deprive …   English terms dictionary

  • deprive — mid 14c., from O.Fr. depriver, from M.L. deprivare, from L. de entirely (see DE (Cf. de )) + privare release from (see PRIVATE (Cf. private)). Replaced O.E. bedælan. Related: Depriving …   Etymology dictionary

  • deprive — [v] keep or take away something wanted, needed bankrupt, bare, bereave, denude, despoil, disinherit, dismantle, dispossess, disrobe, divest, dock, expropriate, hold back, lose, oust, rob, seize, skim, stiff, strip, wrest; concepts 121,142 Ant.… …   New thesaurus

  • Deprive — To deprive a person is an intransitive verb, which can mean: In the Law Child neglect To deprive some person of life, liberty, or property To deprive someone of a peerage, see Titles Deprivation Act 1917 To be deprived of property, see Provident… …   Wikipedia

  • deprive */ — UK [dɪˈpraɪv] / US verb [transitive] Word forms deprive : present tense I/you/we/they deprive he/she/it deprives present participle depriving past tense deprived past participle deprived if you deprive someone of something, you take it away from… …   English dictionary

  • deprive — v. (d; tr.) to deprive of (to deprive smb. of everything) * * * [dɪ praɪv] (d; tr.) to deprive of (to deprive smb. of everything) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • deprive — deprivable, adj. deprival, n. deprivative /di priv euh tiv/, adj. depriver, n. /di pruyv /, v.t., deprived, depriving. 1. to remove or withhold something from the enjoyment or possession of (a person or persons): to deprive a man of life; to… …   Universalium

  • deprive — de|prive [dıˈpraıv] v deprive of [deprive sb of sth] phr v [Date: 1300 1400; : Medieval Latin; Origin: deprivare, from Latin privare to deprive ] to prevent someone from having something, especially something that they need or should have ▪ A lot …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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