Depose De*pose", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deposed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deposing}.][FF. d['e]poser, in the sense of L. deponere to put down; but from pref. d['e]- (L. de) + poser to place. See {Pose}, {Pause}.] 1. To lay down; to divest one's self of; to lay aside. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Thus when the state one Edward did depose, A greater Edward in his room arose. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To let fall; to deposit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Additional mud deposed upon it. --Woodward. [1913 Webster]

3. To remove from a throne or other high station; to dethrone; to divest or deprive of office. [1913 Webster]

A tyrant over his subjects, and therefore worthy to be deposed. --Prynne. [1913 Webster]

4. To testify under oath; to bear testimony to; -- now usually said of bearing testimony which is officially written down for future use. --Abbott. [1913 Webster]

To depose the yearly rent or valuation of lands. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

5. To put under oath. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Depose him in the justice of his cause. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • dépose — [ depoz ] n. f. • 1836; déposage n. m. 1750; de 2. déposer 1 ♦ Techn. Action de déposer, de défaire ce qui a été fixé. Effectuer, faire la dépose d un châssis, d une serrure. 2 ♦ Fait de déposer (qqn). Dépose en hélicoptère des skieurs sur les… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • depose — de·pose /di pōz/ vb de·posed, de·pos·ing vt 1: to testify to under oath or by sworn affidavit 2: to take testimony from esp. by deposition plaintiffs...were entitled to depose experts retained by the defendants National Law Journal compare …   Law dictionary

  • déposé — déposé, ée (dé pô zé, zée) part. passé. 1°   Mis bas. Un fardeau déposé. 2°   Mis en dépôt. De l argent déposé chez un banquier. 3°   Abdiqué. La dignité impériale déposée par Charles Quint. 4°   À qui on a ôté une dignité. L empereur Louis le… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Depose — De*pose , v. i. To bear witness; to testify under oath; to make deposition. [1913 Webster] Then, seeing t was he that made you to despose, Your oath, my lord, is vain and frivolous. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • depose — c.1300, from O.Fr. deposer (12c.), from DE (Cf. de ) down (see DE (Cf. de )) + poser put, place (see POSE (Cf. pose)). Related: Deposed; deposing …   Etymology dictionary

  • depose — [v] oust from position boot out, bounce, break, can*, cashier, chuck, degrade, demote, dethrone, discrown, dismiss, displace, downgrade, drum out, eject, freeze out*, give heaveho*, impeach, kick out*, overthrow, remove from office, ride out on… …   New thesaurus

  • deposé — Deposé, [depos]ée. part …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • depose — ► VERB 1) remove from office suddenly and forcefully. 2) Law testify to or give (evidence) on oath, especially in writing. ORIGIN Old French deposer, from Latin deponere put down …   English terms dictionary

  • depose — [dē pōz′, dipōz′] vt. deposed, deposing [ME deposen, to deprive of office, testify < OFr deposer, to set down < de (L de), from, away + poser (see POSE1), to cease, lie down; confused in sense and form with L deponere (pp. depositus), to… …   English World dictionary

  • depose — v. (D; tr.) to depose from * * * [dɪ pəʊz] (D; tr.) to depose from …   Combinatory dictionary

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