All
All All, n. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake. [1913 Webster]

Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

All that thou seest is mine. --Gen. xxxi. 43. [1913 Webster]

Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a thing, all of us. [1913 Webster]

{After all}, after considering everything to the contrary; nevertheless.

{All in all}, a phrase which signifies all things to a person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly; altogether. [1913 Webster]

Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee, Forever. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Trust me not at all, or all in all. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

{All in the wind} (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake.

{All told}, all counted; in all.

{And all}, and the rest; and everything connected. ``Bring our crown and all.'' --Shak.

{At all}. (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] ``She is a shrew at al(l).'' --Chaucer. (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or to the least extent; in the least; under any circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any property at all? ``Nothing at all.'' --Shak. ``If thy father at all miss me.'' --1 Sam. xx. 6.

{Over all}, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning, or add force to a word. In some instances, it is completely incorporated into words, and its final consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always: but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen, as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant, all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as, allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout, alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are now written separately. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • All — All, a. [OE. al, pl. alle, AS. eal, pl. ealle, Northumbrian alle, akin to D. & OHG. al, Ger. all, Icel. allr. Dan. al, Sw. all, Goth. alls; and perh. to Ir. and Gael. uile, W. oll.] 1. The whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • All — All, adv. 1. Wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement. And cheeks all pale. Byron. [1913 Webster] Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this word …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • All — steht für: umgangssprachliche Kurzform für das Weltall bzw. das Universum ALL ist die Abkürzung für: Akute lymphatische Leukämie Albanischer Lek, die albanische Währung nach ISO 4217 ALL (Band), eine amerikanische Punkrock Band América Latina… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • All — All, conj. [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.] Although; albeit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] All they were wondrous loth. Spenser. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ALL — steht für: umgangssprachlich das Universum ALL ist die Abkürzung für: Akute lymphatische Leukämie Albanischer Lek, die albanische Währung nach ISO 4217 ALL (Band), eine amerikanische Punkrock Band America Latina Logistica S.A., ein… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • all — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English all, al, from Old English eall; akin to Old High German all all Date: before 12th century 1. a. the whole amount, quantity, or extent of < needed all the courage they had > < sat up all night > b. as much as …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • all — See: AFTER ALL, AND ALL, AT ALL, BEAT ALL or BEAT THE DUTCH, FOR ALL, FOR ALL ONE IS WORTH, FOR ALL ONE KNOWS, FOR ALL THE WORLD, FOR GOOD also FOR GOOD AND ALL, FROM THE BOTTOM OF ONE S HEART or WITH ALL ONE S HEART, HAVE ALL ONE S BUTTONS or… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • all — See: AFTER ALL, AND ALL, AT ALL, BEAT ALL or BEAT THE DUTCH, FOR ALL, FOR ALL ONE IS WORTH, FOR ALL ONE KNOWS, FOR ALL THE WORLD, FOR GOOD also FOR GOOD AND ALL, FROM THE BOTTOM OF ONE S HEART or WITH ALL ONE S HEART, HAVE ALL ONE S BUTTONS or… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • ALL — For the hand tools of similar pronunciation, see awl. All can refer to: * Universal quantification, a concept ( all ) in predicate logic * The All, a Hermetic conception of God * Surf (detergent), as an alternative name ( All ) for this laundry… …   Wikipedia

  • all- — or allo combining form Etymology: Greek, from allos other more at else 1. other ; different ; atypical < allogamous > < allotropy > 2. (allo ) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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