degarnishing
degarnish de*gar"nish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {degarnished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {degarnishing}.] [F. d['e]garnir; pref. d['e]-, des- (L. dis-) + garnir to furnish. See {Garnish}, and cf. {Disgarnish}.] 1. To strip or deprive of entirely, as of furniture, ornaments, etc.; to disgarnish; as, to degarnish a house, etc. [R.] [1913 Webster]

2. To deprive of a garrison, or of troops necessary for defense; as, to degarnish a city or fort. [R.] --Washington. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • degarnish — de*gar nish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {degarnished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {degarnishing}.] [F. d[ e]garnir; pref. d[ e] , des (L. dis ) + garnir to furnish. See {Garnish}, and cf. {Disgarnish}.] 1. To strip or deprive of entirely, as of furniture,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • degarnished — degarnish de*gar nish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {degarnished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {degarnishing}.] [F. d[ e]garnir; pref. d[ e] , des (L. dis ) + garnir to furnish. See {Garnish}, and cf. {Disgarnish}.] 1. To strip or deprive of entirely, as of furniture …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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