Deforced
Deforce De*force", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deforced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deforcing}.] [OF. deforcier; de- or des- (L. de or dis-) + forcier, F. forcer. See {Force}, v.] (Law) (a) To keep from the rightful owner; to withhold wrongfully the possession of, as of lands or a freehold. (b) (Scots Law) To resist the execution of the law; to oppose by force, as an officer in the execution of his duty. --Burrill. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • deforced — v. unlawfully withhold property from its owner; forcefully eject or evict …   English contemporary dictionary

  • quod ei deforceat — That he deforced him. The name of the writ authorized by the statute 13 Edward 1, c. 4, for persons whose lands had been recovered against them by default. It was not strictly a writ of right, but so far partook of the nature of one that it could …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Deforce — De*force , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deforced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deforcing}.] [OF. deforcier; de or des (L. de or dis ) + forcier, F. forcer. See {Force}, v.] (Law) (a) To keep from the rightful owner; to withhold wrongfully the possession of, as of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Deforcing — Deforce De*force , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deforced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deforcing}.] [OF. deforcier; de or des (L. de or dis ) + forcier, F. forcer. See {Force}, v.] (Law) (a) To keep from the rightful owner; to withhold wrongfully the possession of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wand — Wand, n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. v[ o]ndr, akin to Dan. vaand, Goth. wandus; perhaps originally, a pliant twig, and akin to E. wind to turn.] 1. A small stick; a rod; a verge. [1913 Webster] With good smart blows of a wand on his back. Locke …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wand of peace — Wand Wand, n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. v[ o]ndr, akin to Dan. vaand, Goth. wandus; perhaps originally, a pliant twig, and akin to E. wind to turn.] 1. A small stick; a rod; a verge. [1913 Webster] With good smart blows of a wand on his back.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Assize of darrein presentment — In English law, the Assize of darrein presentment ( last presentation ) was an action brought to enquire who was in fact the last patron to present a benefice to a church then vacant, of which the plaintiff complained that he was deforced or… …   Wikipedia

  • deforce — deforcement, n. deforcer, n. /di fawrs , fohrs /, v.t., deforced, deforcing. Law. 1. to withhold (property, esp. land) by force or violence, as from the rightful owner. 2. to eject or evict by force. [1250 1300; ME < AF deforcer, OF de(s)forcier …   Universalium

  • deforce — /dəˈfɔs/ (say duh faws) verb (t) (deforced, deforcing) Law to withhold (property, especially land) by force or violence, as from the rightful owner. {Anglo French deforcer, from de de + forcer force (verb) –deforcement, noun …   Australian English dictionary

  • consuetudinibus et serviciis — /konswatyuwdinabas et sarvishiyas/ In old English law, a writ of right close, which lay against a tenant who deforced his lord of the rent or service due to him …   Black's law dictionary

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