Defense De*fense", Defence De*fence", n. [F. d['e]fense, OF. defense, fem., defens, masc., fr. L. defensa (cf. LL. defensum), from defendere. See {Defend}, and cf. {Fence}.] 1. The act of defending, or the state of being defended; protection, as from violence or danger. [1913 Webster]

In cases of defense 't is best to weigh The enemy more mighty than he seems. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. That which defends or protects; anything employed to oppose attack, ward off violence or danger, or maintain security; a guard; a protection. [1913 Webster]

War would arise in defense of the right. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

God, the widow's champion and defense. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Protecting plea; vindication; justification. [1913 Webster]

Men, brethren, and fathers, hear ye my defense. --Acts xxii. 1. [1913 Webster]

4. (Law) The defendant's answer or plea; an opposing or denial of the truth or validity of the plaintiff's or prosecutor's case; the method of proceeding adopted by the defendant to protect himself against the plaintiff's action. [1913 Webster]

5. Act or skill in making defense; defensive plan or policy; practice in self defense, as in fencing, boxing, etc. [1913 Webster]

A man of great defense. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

By how much defense is better than no skill. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Prohibition; a prohibitory ordinance. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Severe defenses . . . against wearing any linen under a certain breadth. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • defence — de‧fence [dɪˈfens] , defense noun [countable] 1. LAW the things that are said in a court of law to try to prove that someone is not guilty of a crime: • I am unhappy about the way my barrister is conducting my defence. 2 …   Financial and business terms

  • defence — If a defendant contests a claim, he should prepare a defence showing his side of the argument which is then filed with the court and given to the person making a claim. If he considers that he in turn has a claim against the person who has… …   Law dictionary

  • DeFence — project. Click to enlarge deFENCE is an interactive conceptual art project for freedom of cohabitation, designed in such a way as to include each beholder personally. In tradition of Marcel Duchamp, the two main roles of this exhibit are the work …   Wikipedia

  • defence — (US defense) ► NOUN 1) the action of defending from or resisting attack. 2) military measures or resources for protecting a country. 3) (defences) fortifications against attack. 4) attempted justification or vindication. 5) the case presented by… …   English terms dictionary

  • Defence — De*fence (d[ e]*f[e^]ns ), n. & v. t. See {Defense}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • defence — see DEFENSE (Cf. defense) …   Etymology dictionary

  • defence — (Brit.) de·fence || dɪ fens n. protection, security (also defense) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • defence — is the spelling in BrE, defense in AmE …   Modern English usage

  • defence — [dē fens′, difens′] n. Brit. sp. of DEFENSE …   English World dictionary

  • defence */*/*/ — UK [dɪˈfens] / US noun Word forms defence : singular defence plural defences 1) [uncountable] actions that you take to protect someone or something that is being attacked come/rush to someone s defence: Two of his friends came to his defence. a)… …   English dictionary

  • defence — (BrE) (AmE defense) noun 1 action to protect sb/sth from attack ADJECTIVE ▪ adequate, effective ▪ immune, natural ▪ the body s natural defence against viruses ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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