Deep Deep (d[=e]p), a. [Compar. {Deeper} (d[=e]p"[~e]r); superl. {Deepest} (d[=e]p"[e^]st).] [OE. dep, deop, AS. de['o]p; akin to D. diep, G. tief, Icel. dj[=u]pr, Sw. diup, Dan. dyb, Goth. diups; fr. the root of E. dip, dive. See {Dip}, {Dive}.] 1. Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth; as, a deep sea. [1913 Webster]

The water where the brook is deep. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.); as, a deep cave or recess or wound; a gallery ten seats deep; a company of soldiers six files deep. [1913 Webster]

Shadowing squadrons deep. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Safely in harbor Is the king's ship in the deep nook. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Low in situation; lying far below the general surface; as, a deep valley. [1913 Webster]

4. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; -- opposed to {shallow} or {superficial}; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure; as, a deep subject or plot. [1913 Webster]

Speculations high or deep. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

A question deep almost as the mystery of life. --De Quincey. [1913 Webster]

O Lord, . . . thy thoughts are very deep. --Ps. xcii. 5. [1913 Webster]

5. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning. [1913 Webster]

Deep clerks she dumbs. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Profound; thorough; complete; unmixed; intense; heavy; heartfelt; as, deep distress; deep melancholy; deep horror. ``Deep despair.'' --Milton. ``Deep silence.'' --Milton. ``Deep sleep.'' --Gen. ii. 21. ``Deeper darkness.'' --Hoole. ``Their deep poverty.'' --2 Cor. viii. 2. [1913 Webster]

An attitude of deep respect. --Motley. [1913 Webster]

7. Strongly colored; dark; intense; not light or thin; as, deep blue or crimson. [1913 Webster]

8. Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy. ``The deep thunder.'' --Byron. [1913 Webster]

The bass of heaven's deep organ. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

9. Muddy; boggy; sandy; -- said of roads. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The ways in that vale were very deep. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster]

{A deep line of operations} (Military), a long line.

{Deep mourning} (Costume), mourning complete and strongly marked, the garments being not only all black, but also composed of lusterless materials and of such fashion as is identified with mourning garments. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • deep — [dēp] adj. [ME dep < OE deop, akin to Ger tief, Goth diups < IE base * dheub , deep, hollow > DIP, DUMP1] 1. extending far downward from the top or top edges, inward from the surface, or backward from the front [a deep cut, a deep lake,… …   English World dictionary

  • deep — UK US /diːp/ adjective [usually before noun] ► very large or serious: »Employees were forced to accept deep cuts in pay and benefits. »a deep recession. »These deep discounts will be a major factor in stimulating local telephone competition in… …   Financial and business terms

  • Deep — Deep, adv. To a great depth; with depth; far down; profoundly; deeply. [1913 Webster] Deep versed in books, and shallow in himself. Milton. [1913 Webster] Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring. Pope. [1913 Webster] Note: Deep, in its usual… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • deep — 1 Deep, profound, abysmal. Deep and profound denote extended either downward from a surface or, less often, backward or inward from a front or outer part. Deep is the most general term {a deep pond} {a slope cut by deep gullies} As applied to… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • deep — ► ADJECTIVE 1) extending far down or in from the top or surface. 2) extending a specified distance from the top, surface, or outer edge. 3) (of sound) low in pitch and full in tone; not shrill. 4) (of colour) dark and intense. 5) very intense,… …   English terms dictionary

  • deep — O.E. deop (adj.) profound, awful, mysterious; serious, solemn; deepness, depth, deope (adv.), from P.Gmc. *deupaz (Cf. O.S. diop, O.Fris. diap, Du. diep, O.H.G. tiof, Ger. tief, O.N. djupr, Dan. dyb, Swed. djup, Goth. diups …   Etymology dictionary

  • deep — deep; deep·en; deep·en·ing·ly; deep·ing; deep·ish; deep·ly; deep·most; deep·ness; deep·wa·ter·man; …   English syllables

  • Deep — Deep, n. 1. That which is deep, especially deep water, as the sea or ocean; an abyss; a great depth. [1913 Webster] Courage from the deeps of knowledge springs. Cowley. [1913 Webster] The hollow deep of hell resounded. Milton. [1913 Webster] Blue …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Deep — ist: der deutsche Name der polnischen Ortschaft Mrzeżyno. Deep (Musical), Schweiz Deep Dance, Bootleg Mixe Siehe auch: The Deep, Kolberger Deep Deep Creek  Wiktionary: deep – Bedeutungserklärungen, Wortherkunft, Synonyme, Übersetzungen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • deep — [adj1] extending very far, usually down abysmal, abyssal, below, beneath, bottomless, broad, buried, deep seated, distant, downreaching, far, fathomless, immersed, inmost, low, profound, rooted, subaqueous, submarine, submerged, subterranean,… …   New thesaurus

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