Deducing
Deduce De*duce", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deduced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deducing}.] [L. deducere; de- + ducere to lead, draw. See {Duke}, and cf. {Deduct}.] 1. To lead forth. [A Latinism] [1913 Webster]

He should hither deduce a colony. --Selden. [1913 Webster]

2. To take away; to deduct; to subtract; as, to deduce a part from the whole. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

3. To derive or draw; to derive by logical process; to obtain or arrive at as the result of reasoning; to gather, as a truth or opinion, from what precedes or from premises; to infer; -- with from or out of. [1913 Webster]

O goddess, say, shall I deduce my rhymes From the dire nation in its early times? --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Reasoning is nothing but the faculty of deducing unknown truths from principles already known. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

See what regard will be paid to the pedigree which deduces your descent from kings and conquerors. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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