Deducibility
Deducibility De*du`ci*bil"i*ty, n. Deducibleness. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • deducibility — noun The condition of being deducible …   Wiktionary

  • deducibility — n. ability to be concluded through reason …   English contemporary dictionary

  • deducibility — de·duc·i·bil·i·ty …   English syllables

  • deducibility —  ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷səˈbiləd.ē noun ( es) : the state or quality of being deducible * * * dedūcibilˈity or dedūcˈibleness noun The quality of being deducible • • • Main Entry: ↑deduce …   Useful english dictionary

  • List of philosophy topics (D-H) — DDaDai Zhen Pierre d Ailly Jean Le Rond d Alembert John Damascene Damascius John of Damascus Peter Damian Danish philosophy Dante Alighieri Arthur Danto Arthur C. Danto Arthur Coleman Danto dao Daodejing Daoism Daoist philosophy Charles Darwin… …   Wikipedia

  • МОДАЛЬНАЯ ЛОГИКА — раздел логики, в котором исследуются логические связи модальных высказываний, т.е. высказываний, включающих модальности. Мл. слагается из ряда направлений, каждое из которых занимается модальными высказываниями определенного типа. В современной М …   Философская энциклопедия

  • logic — logicless, adj. /loj ik/, n. 1. the science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference. 2. a particular method of reasoning or argumentation: We were unable to follow his logic. 3. the system or principles of… …   Universalium

  • proof theory — The study of the relations of deducibility among sentences in a logical calculus . Deducibility is defined purely syntactically, that is, without reference to the intended interpretation of the calculus. See also model theory …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Deducibleness — De*du ci*ble*ness, n. The quality of being deducible; deducibility. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Entailment — For other uses, see Entail (disambiguation). In logic, entailment is a relation between a set of sentences (e.g.,[1] meaningfully declarative sentences or truthbearers) and a sentence. Let Γ be a set of one or more sentences; let S1 be the… …   Wikipedia

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