Declaimed
Declaim De*claim" (d[-e]*kl[=a]m"), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Declaimed} (d[-e]*kl[=a]md"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Declaiming}.] [L. declamare; de- + clamare to cry out: cf. F. d['e]clamer. See {Claim}.] 1. To speak rhetorically; to make a formal speech or oration; to harangue; specifically, to recite a speech, poem, etc., in public as a rhetorical exercise; to practice public speaking; as, the students declaim twice a week. [1913 Webster]

2. To speak for rhetorical display; to speak pompously, noisily, or theatrically; to make an empty speech; to rehearse trite arguments in debate; to rant. [1913 Webster]

Grenville seized the opportunity to declaim on the repeal of the stamp act. --Bancroft. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • declaim — UK [dɪˈkleɪm] / US verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms declaim : present tense I/you/we/they declaim he/she/it declaims present participle declaiming past tense declaimed past participle declaimed formal to say something, especially in a… …   English dictionary

  • de|claim´er — de|claim «dih KLAYM», intransitive verb. 1. to speak like an orator in a loud and emotional manner; speak or write for effect: »Everyone at the table listened as the old soldier declaimed against the lack of patriotism. His eyes and face were… …   Useful english dictionary

  • de|claim — «dih KLAYM», intransitive verb. 1. to speak like an orator in a loud and emotional manner; speak or write for effect: »Everyone at the table listened as the old soldier declaimed against the lack of patriotism. His eyes and face were wild and he… …   Useful english dictionary

  • PROVERB — (Heb. מָשָׁל, mashal; pl. מְשָׁלִים, meshalim). The term proverb as a translation of the biblical Hebrew word mashal denotes certain specific literary forms, particularly of wisdom literature. Several of these forms are also referred to by the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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