Cyanocitta or Cyanura cristata
Blue jay Blue" jay` (Zo["o]l.) The common jay of the United States ({Cyanocitta, or Cyanura, cristata}). The predominant color is bright blue. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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