Cumbered
Cumber Cum"ber (k?m"b?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cumbered} (-b?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cumbering}.] [OE. combren, cumbren,OF. combrer to hinder, from LL. cumbrus a heap, fr. L. cumulus; cf. Skr. ?? to increase, grow strong. Cf. {Cumulate}.] To rest upon as a troublesome or useless weight or load; to be burdensome or oppressive to; to hinder or embarrass in attaining an object, to obstruct or occupy uselessly; to embarrass; to trouble. [1913 Webster]

Why asks he what avails him not in fight, And would but cumber and retard his flight? --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Martha was cumbered about much serving. --Luke x. 40. [1913 Webster]

Cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? -- Luke xiii. 7. [1913 Webster]

The multiplying variety of arguments, especially frivolous ones, . . . but cumbers the memory. --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cumbered — un·cumbered; …   English syllables

  • cumbered — Mawdesley Glossary encumbered …   English dialects glossary

  • cumbered — v. hinder, bother, encumber …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cumbered — cumˈbered adjective 1. Hampered 2. Obstructed • • • Main Entry: ↑cumber …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cumber — Cum ber (k?m b?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cumbered} ( b?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cumbering}.] [OE. combren, cumbren,OF. combrer to hinder, from LL. cumbrus a heap, fr. L. cumulus; cf. Skr. ?? to increase, grow strong. Cf. {Cumulate}.] To rest upon as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cumbering — Cumber Cum ber (k?m b?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cumbered} ( b?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cumbering}.] [OE. combren, cumbren,OF. combrer to hinder, from LL. cumbrus a heap, fr. L. cumulus; cf. Skr. ?? to increase, grow strong. Cf. {Cumulate}.] To rest… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cumber — I. transitive verb (cumbered; cumbering) Etymology: Middle English combren, short for acombren, from Anglo French acumbrer, encumbrer more at encumber Date: 14th century 1. archaic trouble, harass 2. a. to hinder or encumber by being in …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Masteries — Mastery Mas ter*y, n.; pl. {Masteries}. [OF. maistrie.] [1913 Webster] 1. The position or authority of a master; dominion; command; supremacy; superiority. [1913 Webster] If divided by mountains, they will fight for the mastery of the passages of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mastery — Mas ter*y, n.; pl. {Masteries}. [OF. maistrie.] [1913 Webster] 1. The position or authority of a master; dominion; command; supremacy; superiority. [1913 Webster] If divided by mountains, they will fight for the mastery of the passages of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • encumber — transitive verb ( cumbered; encumbering) Etymology: Middle English encombren, from Anglo French encumbrer, from en + Middle French combre dam, weir Date: 14th century 1. weigh down, burden < tourists encumbered by heavy luggage > 2. to impede or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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