cudgelling
Cudgel Cudg"el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} (-?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster]

An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To cudgel one's brains}, to exercise one's wits. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cudgelling — cudg·el || kÊŒdÊ’É™l n. club, bludgeon, tool used to administer beatings v. club, beat, bludgeon, hit with a club …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cudgelling — cudgˈelling noun • • • Main Entry: ↑cudgel …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cudgel — Cudg el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} ( ?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster] An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To cudgel one s brains}, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cudgeled — Cudgel Cudg el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} ( ?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster] An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To cudgel one s brains}, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cudgeling — Cudgel Cudg el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} ( ?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster] An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To cudgel one s brains}, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cudgelled — Cudgel Cudg el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} ( ?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster] An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To cudgel one s brains}, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cudgel one's brains — Cudgel Cudg el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cudgeled} or {Cudgelled} ( ?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cudgeling} or {cudgelling}.] To beat with a cudgel. [1913 Webster] An he here, I would cudgel him like a dog. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To cudgel one s brains}, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cudgel — I. noun Etymology: Middle English kuggel, from Old English cycgel; perhaps akin to Middle High German kugele ball Date: before 12th century a short heavy club II. transitive verb ( geled or gelled; geling or cudgelling) Date: 1596 t …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Scottish highland dance — The term Highland Dancing is used today to refer to a style of athletic solo dancing which evolved into its current form during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the context of competitions at public events (namely, Highland games), where …   Wikipedia

  • Scottish sword dances — are ritualistic and combative dances that imitated epic deeds and martial skills and are a familiar feature in Scottish tradition and folklore.Notwithstanding Welsh and English Morris dance, related dances are known in Austria, Germany,… …   Wikipedia

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