Crystalline spheres
Crystalline Crys"tal*line (kr?s"tal-l?n or -l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See {Crystal}.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. [1913 Webster]

Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture. [1913 Webster]

Their crystalline structure. --Whewell. [1913 Webster]

3. Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectly crystallized. [1913 Webster]

4. Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid. ``The crystalline sky.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{Crystalline heavens}, or {Crystalline spheres}, in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, two transparent spheres imagined to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile (or outer circle of the heavens, which by its motion was supposed to carry round all those within it), in order to explain certain movements of the heavenly bodies.

{Crystalline lens} (Anat.), the capsular lenslike body in the eye, serving to focus the rays of light. It consists of rodlike cells derived from the external embryonic epithelium. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Crystalline — Crys tal*line (kr?s tal l?n or l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See {Crystal}.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. [1913 Webster] Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Formed by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crystalline heavens — Crystalline Crys tal*line (kr?s tal l?n or l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See {Crystal}.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. [1913 Webster] Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Formed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crystalline lens — Crystalline Crys tal*line (kr?s tal l?n or l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See {Crystal}.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. [1913 Webster] Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Formed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crystalline (song) — Crystalline / Cosmogony Crystalline cover Single by Björk from the album Biophilia …   Wikipedia

  • crystalline heaven — noun or crystalline sphere : either of two transparent spheres imagined in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile in order to explain certain observed movements of the heavenly… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Crystalline sphere — Sphere Sphere, n. [OE. spere, OF. espere, F. sph[ e]re, L. sphaera,. Gr. ??? a sphere, a ball.] 1. (Geom.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Klerksdorp Spheres — The Klerksdorp Spheres are small, often spherical to disc shaped, objects, which have been collected by miners and rockhounds from 3.0 billion year old pyrophyllite deposits mined by Wonderstone Ltd., near Ottosdal, South Africa. These objects… …   Wikipedia

  • Music of the spheres — Sphere Sphere, n. [OE. spere, OF. espere, F. sph[ e]re, L. sphaera,. Gr. ??? a sphere, a ball.] 1. (Geom.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • science, history of — Introduction       the history of science from its beginnings in prehistoric times to the 20th century.       On the simplest level, science is knowledge of the world of nature. There are many regularities in nature that mankind has had to… …   Universalium

  • physical science — physical scientist. 1. any of the natural sciences dealing with inanimate matter or with energy, as physics, chemistry, and astronomy. 2. these sciences collectively. [1835 45] * * * Introduction       the systematic study of the inorganic world …   Universalium

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