Crept
Creep Creep (kr[=e]p), v. t. [imp. {Crept} (kr[e^]pt) ({Crope} (kr[=o]p), Obs.); p. p. {Crept}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Creeping}.] [OE. crepen, creopen, AS. cre['o]pan; akin to D. kruipen, G. kriechen, Icel. krjupa, Sw. krypa, Dan. krybe. Cf. {Cripple}, {Crouch}.] 1. To move along the ground, or on any other surface, on the belly, as a worm or reptile; to move as a child on the hands and knees; to crawl. [1913 Webster]

Ye that walk The earth, and stately tread, or lowly creep. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To move slowly, feebly, or timorously, as from unwillingness, fear, or weakness. [1913 Webster]

The whining schoolboy . . . creeping, like snail, Unwillingly to school. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Like a guilty thing, I creep. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

3. To move in a stealthy or secret manner; to move imperceptibly or clandestinely; to steal in; to insinuate itself or one's self; as, age creeps upon us. [1913 Webster]

The sophistry which creeps into most of the books of argument. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

Of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women. --2. Tim. iii. 6. [1913 Webster]

4. To slip, or to become slightly displaced; as, the collodion on a negative, or a coat of varnish, may creep in drying; the quicksilver on a mirror may creep. [1913 Webster]

5. To move or behave with servility or exaggerated humility; to fawn; as, a creeping sycophant. [1913 Webster]

To come as humbly as they used to creep. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To grow, as a vine, clinging to the ground or to some other support by means of roots or rootlets, or by tendrils, along its length. ``Creeping vines.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

7. To have a sensation as of insects creeping on the skin of the body; to crawl; as, the sight made my flesh creep. See {Crawl}, v. i., 4. [1913 Webster]

8. To drag in deep water with creepers, as for recovering a submarine cable. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Crept — (kr[e^]pt), imp. & p. p. of {Creep}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • crept — [krept] the past tense and past participle of ↑creep …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • crept — the past tense and past participle of creep1 …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • crept — p.t. and pp. of CREEP (Cf. creep) (v.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • crept — [krept] vi. pt. & pp. of CREEP …   English World dictionary

  • Crept — Creep Creep (kr[=e]p), v. t. [imp. {Crept} (kr[e^]pt) ({Crope} (kr[=o]p), Obs.); p. p. {Crept}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Creeping}.] [OE. crepen, creopen, AS. cre[ o]pan; akin to D. kruipen, G. kriechen, Icel. krjupa, Sw. krypa, Dan. krybe. Cf. {Cripple} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • crept — [[t]kre̱pt[/t]] Crept is the past tense and past participle of creep …   English dictionary

  • crept — past and past participle of creep …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • crept — /krept/, v. pt. and pp. of creep. * * * …   Universalium

  • crept — kriːp n. person who makes one s skin crawl (Slang) v. crawl; climb; sneak, move along quietly and slowly …   English contemporary dictionary

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