Cramp ring
Cramp Cramp (kr[a^]mp), n. [OE. crampe, craumpe; akin to D. & Sw. kramp, Dan. krampe, G. krampf (whence F. crampe), Icel. krappr strait, narrow, and to E. crimp, crumple; cf. cram. See {Grape}.] 1. That which confines or contracts; a restraint; a shackle; a hindrance. [1913 Webster]

A narrow fortune is a cramp to a great mind. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

Crippling his pleasures with the cramp of fear. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

2. (Masonry) A device, usually of iron bent at the ends, used to hold together blocks of stone, timbers, etc.; a cramp iron. [1913 Webster]

3. (Carp.) A rectangular frame, with a tightening screw, used for compressing the joints of framework, etc. [1913 Webster]

4. A piece of wood having a curve corresponding to that of the upper part of the instep, on which the upper leather of a boot is stretched to give it the requisite shape. [1913 Webster]

5. (Med.) A spasmodic and painful involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles, as of the leg. [1913 Webster]

The cramp, divers nights, gripeth him in his legs. --Sir T. More. [1913 Webster]

6. (Med.) A paralysis of certain muscles due to excessive use; as, writer's cramp; milker's cramp, etc. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Cramp bone}, the patella of a sheep; -- formerly used as a charm for the cramp. --Halliwell. ``He could turn cramp bones into chess men.'' --Dickens.

{Cramp ring}, a ring formerly supposed to have virtue in averting or curing cramp, as having been consecrated by one of the kings of England on Good Friday. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cramp-ring — crampˈ ring noun A ring formerly blessed by the sovereign on Good Friday against cramp and falling sickness • • • Main Entry: ↑cramp …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cramp-ring — Cramp rings are rings anciently worn as a cure for cramp and falling sickness or epilepsy.[1] The legend is that the first one was presented to Edward the Confessor by a pilgrim on his return from Jerusalem, its miraculous properties being… …   Wikipedia

  • cramp ring — noun Etymology: cramp (I) 1. : a ring supposed to avert or cure sickness (as cramp or epilepsy); specifically : one formerly consecrated for this purpose by one of the sovereigns of England on Good Friday 2. obsolete …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cramp — (kr[a^]mp), n. [OE. crampe, craumpe; akin to D. & Sw. kramp, Dan. krampe, G. krampf (whence F. crampe), Icel. krappr strait, narrow, and to E. crimp, crumple; cf. cram. See {Grape}.] 1. That which confines or contracts; a restraint; a shackle; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cramp bone — Cramp Cramp (kr[a^]mp), n. [OE. crampe, craumpe; akin to D. & Sw. kramp, Dan. krampe, G. krampf (whence F. crampe), Icel. krappr strait, narrow, and to E. crimp, crumple; cf. cram. See {Grape}.] 1. That which confines or contracts; a restraint; a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cramp rings —    From the reign of Edward III to that of Mary Tudor, monarchs used to bless a plateful of gold and silver rings every *Good Friday at the altar of the Chapel Royal, rubbing them between their fingers; thanks to the royal healing touch (cf.… …   A Dictionary of English folklore

  • Crampet — Cram pet (kr?m p?t), n. [See {Cramp},n.] 1. (Mil.) A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard. [Written also {crampit} and {crampette}.] [1913 Webster] 2. One of the plates of iron, with attached spikes, forming a pair of crampoons;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • crampette — Crampet Cram pet (kr?m p?t), n. [See {Cramp},n.] 1. (Mil.) A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard. [Written also {crampit} and {crampette}.] [1913 Webster] 2. One of the plates of iron, with attached spikes, forming a pair of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • crampit — Crampet Cram pet (kr?m p?t), n. [See {Cramp},n.] 1. (Mil.) A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard. [Written also {crampit} and {crampette}.] [1913 Webster] 2. One of the plates of iron, with attached spikes, forming a pair of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ger-3 —     ger 3     English meaning: to turn, wind     Deutsche Übersetzung: “drehen, winden”     Material: A. O.Ind. guṇá ḥ (*gr̥ nó s) “ the single thread of a string, line, cord; stain “ (dvi , tri guṇa actually “ consisting of two, three threads …   Proto-Indo-European etymological dictionary

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