Countermanding
Countermand Coun`ter*mand" (koun`t[~e]r*m[.a]nd"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Countermanded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Countermanding}.] [F. contremander; contre (L. contra) + mander to command, fr. L. mandare. Cf. {Mandate}.] 1. To revoke (a former command); to cancel or rescind by giving an order contrary to one previously given; as, to countermand an order for goods. [1913 Webster]

2. To prohibit; to forbid. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Avicen countermands letting blood in choleric bodies. --Harvey. [1913 Webster]

3. To oppose; to revoke the command of. [1913 Webster]

For us to alter anything, is to lift ourselves against God; and, as it were, to countermand him. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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