Corner Cor"ner (k?r"n?r), n. [OF. corniere, cornier, LL. cornerium, corneria, fr. L. cornu horn, end, point. See {Horn}.] 1. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal. [1913 Webster]

2. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point; as, the chimney corner. [1913 Webster]

3. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part. [1913 Webster]

From the four corners of the earth they come. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook. [1913 Webster]

This thing was not done in a corner. --Acts xxvi. 26. [1913 Webster]

5. Direction; quarter. [1913 Webster]

Sits the wind in that corner! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price; as, a corner in a railway stock. [Broker's Cant] [1913 Webster]

{Corner stone}, the stone which lies at the corner of two walls, and unites them; the principal stone; especially, the stone which forms the corner of the foundation of an edifice; hence, that which is fundamental importance or indispensable. ``A prince who regarded uniformity of faith as the corner stone of his government.'' --Prescott.

{Corner tooth}, one of the four teeth which come in a horse's mouth at the age of four years and a half, one on each side of the upper and of the lower jaw, between the middle teeth and the tushes. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • corner — 1. (kor né) v. n. 1°   Sonner du cornet, d une corne ou d une trompe. Le vacher a corné dès le matin. 2°   Parler dans un cornet pour se faire entendre au loin ou pour se faire entendre à un sourd. •   Il continue et corne à toute outrance :… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • corner — [kôr′nər] n. [ME < OFr corniere < ML cornerium < L cornu, projecting point, HORN] 1. the point or place where lines or surfaces join and form an angle 2. the area or space within the angle formed at the joining of lines or surfaces [the… …   English World dictionary

  • Corner — ist die englische Bezeichnung für Ecke in Österreich und der Schweiz die Bezeichnung für einen Eckstoß der venezianische Name der italienischen Adelsfamilie Cornaro im Börsenhandel die Bezeichnung für eine Form der Marktmanipulation, siehe Corner …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • corner — Corner. v. n. Sonner d un cornet ou d une corne. Le Vacher a corné dés le matin. j ay entendu corner dans les bois. On dit par derision d Un homme qui sonne mal du cor, qu Il ne fait que corner. On dit quelquefois d une personne qui publie… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • corner — CORNER. v. n. Sonner d un cornet ou d une corne. Le vacher a corné dès le matin. J ai entendu corner dans les bois. f♛/b] On dit par dérision, d Un homme qui sonne mal du cor, ou qui en importune les voisins, qu Il ne fait que corner.[b]Corner,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • corner — cor‧ner [ˈkɔːnə ǁ ˈkɔːrnər] verb corner the market COMMERCE to gain control of the whole supply of a particular type of goods or services: • Singapore has made significant efforts to corner the market in this type of specialised service company.… …   Financial and business terms

  • corner — ► NOUN 1) a place or angle where two or more sides or edges meet. 2) a place where two streets meet. 3) a secluded or remote region or area. 4) a difficult or awkward position. 5) a position in which one dominates the supply of a particular… …   English terms dictionary

  • Corner — Cor ner, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cornered} ( n?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cornering}.] 1. To drive into a corner. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive into a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment; as, to corner a person in argument. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • corner — late 13c., from Anglo Fr. cornere (O.Fr. corniere), from O.Fr. corne horn, corner, from V.L. *corna, from L. cornua, pl. of cornu projecting point, end, horn (see HORN (Cf. horn)). Replaced O.E. hyrne. As an adj., from 1530s. The verb (late 14c.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • corner — [n1] angle bend, branch, cloverleaf, crook, crossing, edge, fork, intersection, joint, junction, projection, ridge, rim, shift, V*, veer, Y*; concepts 436,484,513 corner [n2] niche angle, cavity, compartment, cranny, hideaway, hide out, hole,… …   New thesaurus

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