Coom
Coom Coom, n. [Cf. G. kahm mold gathered on liquids, D. kam, Sw. kimr["o]k pine soot, smoke black, Icel. k[=a]m grime, film of dirt.] Soot; coal dust; refuse matter, as the dirty grease which comes from axle boxes, or the refuse at the mouth of an oven. --Phillips. Bailey. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Coom — (Coomb), Maß, so v. w. Comb …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Coom — (Comb, spr. kūm, kōm), engl. Hohlmaß, = 1/2 Quarter = 145,39 Lit., in manchen Kolonien und den Vereinigten Staaten = 140,95 Lit …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Coom — (spr. kuhm) oder Comb, engl. Getreidemaß zu 4 Bushels = 145,39 l, in manchen Kolonien und in Nordamerika = 140,95 l …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • coom — be·coom; coom; …   English syllables

  • Coom — This interesting name is of medieval English origin and is a dialectal of the locational or topographical name Coombe, itself from any of the numerous places named with the Old English pre 7th Century cumb , denoting a short, straight valley.… …   Surnames reference

  • coom — /koohm/, n. Chiefly Scot. and North Eng. 1. soot; coal dust; smut. 2. dust, esp. sawdust or dust from a gristmill. 3. grease from bearings, axles, etc. Also, coomb. [1580 90; var. of CULM1] * * * …   Universalium

  • coom — noun a) soot, smut b) dust …   Wiktionary

  • coom — Mawdesley Glossary came …   English dialects glossary

  • coom —    see coomb …   Dictionary of units of measurement

  • coom — I. noun or coomb ˈküm ( s) Etymology: Middle English culme more at culm 1. dialect Britain a …   Useful english dictionary

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