Continuous impost
Continuous Con*tin"u*ous, a. [L. continuus, fr. continere to hold together. See {Continent}.] 1. Without break, cessation, or interruption; without intervening space or time; uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; unceasing; constant; continued; protracted; extended; as, a continuous line of railroad; a continuous current of electricity. [1913 Webster]

he can hear its continuous murmur. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Not deviating or varying from uninformity; not interrupted; not joined or articulated. [1913 Webster]

{Continuous brake} (Railroad), a brake which is attached to each car a train, and can be caused to operate in all the cars simultaneously from a point on any car or on the engine.

{Continuous impost}. See {Impost}.

Syn: {Continuous}, {Continual}.

Usage: Continuous is the stronger word, and denotes that the continuity or union of parts is absolute and uninterrupted; as, a continuous sheet of ice; a continuous flow of water or of argument. So Daniel Webster speaks of ``a continuous and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England.'' Continual, in most cases, marks a close and unbroken succession of things, rather than absolute continuity. Thus we speak of continual showers, implying a repetition with occasional interruptions; we speak of a person as liable to continual calls, or as subject to continual applications for aid, etc. See {Constant}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Continuous — Con*tin u*ous, a. [L. continuus, fr. continere to hold together. See {Continent}.] 1. Without break, cessation, or interruption; without intervening space or time; uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; unceasing; constant; continued; protracted;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Continuous brake — Continuous Con*tin u*ous, a. [L. continuus, fr. continere to hold together. See {Continent}.] 1. Without break, cessation, or interruption; without intervening space or time; uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; unceasing; constant; continued;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Impost — Im post, n. [OF. impost, F. impot, LL. impostus, fr. L. impostus, p. p. of imponere to impose. See {Impone}.] 1. That which is imposed or levied; a tax, tribute, or duty; especially, a duty or tax laid by goverment on goods imported into a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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