Constructive crimes
Constructive Con*struct"ive, a. [Cf. F. constructif.] 1. Having ability to construct or form; employed in construction; as, to exhibit constructive power. [1913 Webster]

The constructive fingers of Watts. --Emerson. [1913 Webster]

2. Derived from, or depending on, construction, inference, or interpretation; not directly expressed, but inferred. [1913 Webster]

3. helpful; promoting improvement; intended to help; as, constructive criticism; constructive suggestions. Contrasted with {destructive}. [PJC]

{Constructive crimes} (Law), acts having effects analogous to those of some statutory or common law crimes; as, constructive treason. Constructive crimes are no longer recognized by the courts.

{Constructive notice}, notice imputed by construction of law.

{Constructive trust}, a trust which may be assumed to exist, though no actual mention of it be made. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Constructive — Con*struct ive, a. [Cf. F. constructif.] 1. Having ability to construct or form; employed in construction; as, to exhibit constructive power. [1913 Webster] The constructive fingers of Watts. Emerson. [1913 Webster] 2. Derived from, or depending… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Constructive notice — Constructive Con*struct ive, a. [Cf. F. constructif.] 1. Having ability to construct or form; employed in construction; as, to exhibit constructive power. [1913 Webster] The constructive fingers of Watts. Emerson. [1913 Webster] 2. Derived from,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Constructive trust — Constructive Con*struct ive, a. [Cf. F. constructif.] 1. Having ability to construct or form; employed in construction; as, to exhibit constructive power. [1913 Webster] The constructive fingers of Watts. Emerson. [1913 Webster] 2. Derived from,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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