Constraining
Constrain Con*strain", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Constrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Constraining}.] [OF. constraindre, F. contrainde, L. constringere; con- + stringere to draw tight. See {Strain}, and. cf. {Constrict}, {Constringe}.] 1. To secure by bonds; to chain; to bond or confine; to hold tightly; to constringe. [1913 Webster]

He binds in chains The drowsy prophet, and his limbs constrains. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

When winter frosts constrain the fields with cold. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To bring into a narrow compass; to compress. [1913 Webster]

How the strait stays the slender waist constrain. --Gay. [1913 Webster]

3. To hold back by force; to restrain; to repress. [1913 Webster]

My sire in caves constrains the winds. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To compel; to force; to necessitate; to oblige. [1913 Webster]

The love of Christ constraineth us. --2. Cor. v. 14. [1913 Webster]

I was constrained to appeal unto C[ae]sar. --Acts xxviii. 19. [1913 Webster]

5. To violate; to ravish. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To produce in such a manner as to give an unnatural effect; as, a constrained voice.

Syn: To compel; force; drive; impel; urge; press. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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