Constant of integration
Constant Con"stant, n. 1. That which is not subject to change; that which is invariable. [1913 Webster]

2. (Math.) A quantity that does not change its value; -- used in countradistinction to {variable}. [1913 Webster]

3. (Astron.) A number whose value, when ascertained (as by observation) and substituted in a general mathematical formula expressing an astronomical law, completely determines that law and enables predictions to be made of its effect in particular cases. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

4. (Physics) A number expressing some property or condition of a substance or of an instrument of precision; as, the dielectric constant of quartz; the collimation constant of a transit instrument. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

5. (Computers) a data structure that does not change during the course of execution of a program. It may be a number, a string, or a more complex data structure; -- contrasted with {variable}. [PJC]

{Aberration constant}, or {Constant of aberration} (Astron.), a number which by substitution in the general formula for aberration enables a prediction to be made of the effect of aberration on a star anywhere situated. Its value is 20[sec].47.

{Absolute constant} (Math.), one whose value is absolutely the same under all circumstances, as the number 10, or any numeral.

{Arbitrary constant}, an undetermined constant in a differential equation having the same value during all changes in the values of the variables.

{Gravitation constant} (Physics), the acceleration per unit of time produced by the attraction of a unit of mass at unit distance. When this is known the acceleration produced at any distance can be calculated.

{Solar constant} (Astron.), the quantity of heat received by the earth from the sun in a unit of time. It is, on the C. G. S. system, 0.0417 small calories per square centimeter per second. --Young. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Constant of integration} (Math.), an undetermined constant added to every result of integration. [1913 Webster + Webster 1913 Suppl.]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Constant of integration — In calculus, the indefinite integral of a given function (i.e., the set of all antiderivatives of the function) is only defined up to an additive constant, the constant of integration.[1][2] This constant expresses an ambiguity inherent in the… …   Wikipedia

  • constant of integration — integravimo pastovioji statusas T sritis automatika atitikmenys: angl. constant of integration vok. Integrationskonstante, f rus. постоянная интегрирования, f pranc. constante d intégration, f …   Automatikos terminų žodynas

  • constant of integration — integravimo konstanta statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. constant of integration vok. Integrationskonstante, f rus. константа интегрирования, f; постоянная интегрирования, f pranc. constante d’intégration, f …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • constant of integration — Math. a constant that is added to the function obtained by evaluating the indefinite integral of a given function, indicating that all indefinite integrals of the given function differ by, at most, a constant. * * * …   Universalium

  • constant of integration — Math. a constant that is added to the function obtained by evaluating the indefinite integral of a given function, indicating that all indefinite integrals of the given function differ by, at most, a constant …   Useful english dictionary

  • constant of integration — noun An unspecified constant term added to a particular antiderivative to make it represent its whole family of antiderivatives …   Wiktionary

  • Constant of aberration — Constant Con stant, n. 1. That which is not subject to change; that which is invariable. [1913 Webster] 2. (Math.) A quantity that does not change its value; used in countradistinction to {variable}. [1913 Webster] 3. (Astron.) A number whose… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Linearity of integration — In calculus, linearity is a fundamental property of the integral that follows from the sum rule in integration and the constant factor rule in integration. Linearity of integration is related to the linearity of summation, since integrals are… …   Wikipedia

  • Order of integration (calculus) — For the summary statistic in time series, see Order of integration. Topics in Calculus Fundamental theorem Limits of functions Continuity Mean value theorem Differential calculus  Derivative Change of variables Implicit differentiati …   Wikipedia

  • Constant — Con stant, n. 1. That which is not subject to change; that which is invariable. [1913 Webster] 2. (Math.) A quantity that does not change its value; used in countradistinction to {variable}. [1913 Webster] 3. (Astron.) A number whose value, when… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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